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cascade processing

cascade processing  

The implementation of later stages of information processing before the completion of earlier stages. For example, in retrieving the meaning of a printed word, a person may have to identify all the ...
Conversion

Conversion  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Also known as functional shift or zero derivation. This is the process whereby a new word is derived by change in part of speech, without adding a derivational affix; e.g. ...
Generative Morphology

Generative Morphology  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Within the theoretical framework of early generative grammar, morphology was not considered an autonomous component of the grammar; it was split between morphophonology, as part of phonology, and ...
Grammatical Relations

Grammatical Relations  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Traditionally, the term G[rammatical] R[elation] (sometimes also “Grammatical Function”) has identified relations between a verb and its dependents, such as ‘subject of’, ‘direct/indirect object of’, ...
lexical access

lexical access  

The process by which a person retrieves items from a lexicon (2). [From Greek lexis a word, from legein to speak]
lexicography

lexicography  

The discipline of lexicography is the practical process of compiling dictionaries and related reference works, such as thesauruses, glossaries, concordances, and usage guides. Lexicography also ...
lexicology

lexicology  

The study of the development and present state of the lexicon (1) of a language. [From Greek lexis a word, from legein to speak + logos word, discourse, or reason]
Lexicon

Lexicon   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
3,406 words

This entry includes the following subentries:

mental lexicon

mental lexicon  

Another name for a lexicon (2).
Principles and Parameters

Principles and Parameters  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
The principle and parameters (P&P) approach to syntax seeks to describe principles that appear to be invariant across languages—and that are hence, by hypothesis, innate (Chomsky 1981, 1995)—and to ...
semantics

semantics  

[Th]The study of the imputed relations between signs and the designata: the meaning of signs such as may be found in material culture and its disposition.
Stem and Root

Stem and Root  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
The two traditional notions of “stem” and “root” can most easily be understood as what remains when affixes are removed from a word. The root is obtained by stripping off ...
stylostatistics

stylostatistics  

The objective analysis of the relative frequencies of stylistic forms and patterns in the use of language, especially written texts. In practice, stylostatistical studies have focused on the ...
Subcategorization and Selection

Subcategorization and Selection  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Information about subcategorization and selection forms part of the lexical entry which specifies those properties of words which are essential to their linguistic analysis. Each lexical item imposes ...
Syntactic Features

Syntactic Features  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Syntactic or categorial features, first suggested by Chomsky 1970, permit the representation of lexical categories and their projections as non-primitive entities. A number of syntactic features have ...
Words

Words  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Linguistic units, probably because of their pragmatic and functional character, are notoriously difficult to define. For the sentence as well as for the word, many definitions have been proposed; but ...

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