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William Laud

(1573—1645) archbishop of Canterbury

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altar rails

altar rails  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Rails to protect the altar from profanation were widely introduced in English churches in the early years of Elizabeth I, when the rood screens and their protecting doors were removed. Disliked by ...
ancient philosophy

ancient philosophy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
‘Ancient philosophy’ is the conventional title, in Europe and the English-speaking academy, for the philosophical activities of the thinkers of the Graeco-Roman world. It includes a succession of ...
Anglican Ordinations

Anglican Ordinations  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Until the subject was removed from public discussion in the RC Church by Leo XIII's bull ‘Apostolicae Curae’ (1896), there was diversity of opinion in that Church about the validity of Anglican ...
Anglicanism

Anglicanism  

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Overview Page
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Religion
Of, relating to, or denoting the Church of England or any Church in communion with it. The name comes (in the early 17th century) from medieval Latin Anglicanus (its adoption suggested by Anglicana ...
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A collection of seven manuscripts written in Anglo‐Saxon (Old English) that together provide a history of England from the beginning of the conversion to Christianity up to 1154. The major text ...
Arminianism

Arminianism  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The doctrine of James Arminius or Harmensen (d. 1609), a Dutch Protestant theologian whose views were opposed to those of Calvin, especially on predestination.
Arthur Johnston

Arthur Johnston  

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Overview Page
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Literature
(1587–1641),doctor and Latin poet: b. Inverurie; Rector of Aberdeen University 1637–41. Musae Aulicae 1637, Delitiae Poetarum Scotorum (ed.) 1637.
Bath and Wells

Bath and Wells  

A see in the Province of Canterbury, founded c.909 as the diocese of Wells. Sometime between 1088 and 1091 the see was moved to Bath. Honorius III authorized the title ‘Bath and Wells’ in 1219, and ...
Bodleian Library

Bodleian Library  

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Overview Page
The library of Oxford University, one of six copyright libraries in the UK. The first library was founded in the 14th century, but was refounded by Sir Thomas Bodley (1545–1613), English scholar and ...
Brian Duppa

Brian Duppa  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(1588–1662), Bp. successively of Chichester (from 1638), Salisbury (1641), and Winchester (1660). From 1645 to 1660 he was one of the leaders of the persecuted Church; he tried to keep the extruded ...
Brian Walton

Brian Walton  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(c. 1600–61),Bp. of Chester and editor of the ‘London Polyglot Bible’. Educated at Magdalene College and Peterhouse, Cambridge, in 1628 he became rector of St Martin's Orgar in London. ...
Cambridge Platonists

Cambridge Platonists  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
A small group of mid-17th century thinkers centred on Cambridge, whose members included Ralph Cudworth, Henry More, and Benjamin Whichcote. The problems they addressed included the rise of low-church ...
Charles I

Charles I  

(1600–49),king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625–49). Charles was the second son of James VI. Born in Scotland, he moved to England in 1604 after his father ascended the English throne. He ...
civil wars

civil wars  

1642–51.In 1629 Charles I dismissed Parliament, resolving never to call another. He might have succeeded but for the problem of the multiple kingdoms. During the 1630s he decided to bring Scottish ...
congregationalism

congregationalism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Protestant churches based on local autonomy and the equality of all believers. Baptism and the Lord's Supper are the only sacraments accepted. As in other reformed Churches, there are ministers who ...
coronation

coronation  

As formal acknowledgement of a monarch's right to rule, the coronation confirms their accession and acceptance by their subjects. For early warrior kings, the principle of succession was by election ...
Court of High Commission

Court of High Commission  

Known as such from c.1570, it emanated from earlier ecclesiastical commissions (after 1547), was given statutory authority (1559), reconstructed (1583), and exercised the ecclesiastical appellate and ...
diocese of Bristol

diocese of Bristol  

The see, founded in 1542 by Henry VIII, is now roughly conterminous with the city of Bristol. Its poverty, and the need to create the Ripon and Manchester dioceses without increasing the total bench ...
diocese of Gloucester

diocese of Gloucester  

The see, conterminous with Gloucestershire, was founded in 1541 by Henry VIII from part of the Worcester diocese. The Norman cathedral, previously St Peter's Benedictine abbey church, was partly ...
diocese of St Davids

diocese of St Davids  

The cathedral of St David, which still houses the bones of the patron saint of Wales, is one of the outstanding buildings in the principality. Bernard persuaded Pope Calixtus II to canonize David, ...

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