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Lateran Basilica

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Augustinian canons

Augustinian canons  

(‘Regular’ or ‘Black’ canons) had their origin in the mid‐11th‐cent. ecclesiastical reform movement. Earlier communities of clerics (or ‘canons’) staffing cathedrals and large churches and organized ...
baptistery

baptistery  

A structure or a space containing the water font used for baptism. The early Christian baptistery was a more or less separate edifice, which might be connected to the church ...
basilica

basilica  

A large oblong hall or building with double colonnades and a semicircular apse, used in ancient Rome as a law court or for public assemblies. The name was then applied to a building of this type used ...
churches of Rome

churches of Rome  

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Religion
From the innumerable Roman churches of historic and ecclesiastical interest, only a selection, necessarily somewhat arbitrary, can be listed in this article. For the four ‘Major Basilicas’—(1) St ...
Cola di Rienzo

Cola di Rienzo  

(c.1313–54), Tribune of the Roman People. In 1343 he was part of a Roman embassy sent to Clement VI to persuade him to return to Rome; his ability impressed the Pope. In May 1347 he stirred up a ...
Constantine I

Constantine I  

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‘the Great’ (c. ad 272/3–337), b. in the Balkan province of Moesia, was son of Constantius I and Helena. When Constantius, now senior Augustus, died at Eburacum (306), his troops proclaimed ...
dedication of churches

dedication of churches  

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Religion
The earliest recorded instance of the dedication of a Christian church is that of the cathedral at Tyre in 314. For the solemn consecration of permanent churches, an elaborate ritual developed, ...
Donation of Constantine

Donation of Constantine  

A famous medieval forgery, probably composed around the year 750. The Donation of Constantine claimed to record a gift from Emperor Constantine I (d. 337) to Pope Silvester I, made ...
Emmanuel Schelstrate

Emmanuel Schelstrate  

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Religion
(1649–92), Belgium Church historian and canonist. He became Prefect of the Vatican Library. His treatise on the disciplina arcani (1685) developed the view that the secrecy demanded by Christ, the ...
Fabiola

Fabiola  

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Religion
(d. 399)was a member of the patrician family of Fabia. She married a young man of appropriate rank, but divorced him for his vicious life. She then married again against the Church canons, causing ...
Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina  

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Music
(b Palestrina, nr. Rome, c.1525; d Rome, 1594).It. composer who took his name from his birthplace. Chorister at S. Maria Maggiore, Rome, in 1537. Studied in Rome c.1540. Organist and choirmaster, ...
Gregory XVI

Gregory XVI  

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Religion
(1765–1846), Pope from 1831. Soon after his election revolution broke out in the Papal states and was quelled only by the intervention of Austria. The troubles continued, and for most of his ...
Lateran

Lateran   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

the site in Rome containing the cathedral church of Rome (a basilica dedicated to St John the Baptist and St John the Evangelist, originally founded in the 4th century by ...

Oecumenical Councils

Oecumenical Councils  

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Religion
Assemblies of bishops and other ecclesiastical representatives of the whole world whose decisions on doctrine, discipline, etc. are considered binding on all Christians. According to RC canon law, ...
Orlande de Lassus

Orlande de Lassus  

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Music
(b Mons, 1532; d Munich, 1594).Flemish composer. In boyhood and youth travelled in Sicily and Italy in service of various aristocrats. Choirmaster, St John Lateran, Rome, 1553–4. Returned to ...
Pope Joan

Pope Joan  

The legend that a woman, in male disguise, was elected Pope c.1100 and died after giving birth to a child, first appeared in the 13th cent. It is without foundation.
Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome

Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome  

The church was founded by Pope Liberius (352–66); the present structure was erected under Sixtus III (432–40). According to a medieval tradition the site was indicated by the BVM, who one August ...
Scala Sancta

Scala Sancta  

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Religion
A staircase of 28 marble steps near the Lateran church at Rome. Tradition asserts that they were the steps descended by Christ after His condemnation to death and brought to the W. by St Helena from ...
Sixtus V

Sixtus V  

(1521–90), Pope from 1585. His pontificate was devoted to far-reaching reforms in the government of the Church and of the Papal States, ruthlessly implemented. He put the Papal finances on a sound ...
St Cyprian

St Cyprian  

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Religion
(c.300), a converted magician of Antioch. According to a probably worthless legend, he was converted while using his magic arts to ensnare a Christian virgin. He became a bishop and was beheaded in ...

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