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Aral Sea

Aral Sea  

A very large freshwaterlake (formerly the world's fourth largest lake) on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. Since the 1960s the lake has been drying up and shrinking as a ...
channel storage

channel storage  

The volume of water that is temporarily stored in a river channel and its floodplain while it flows towards an outlet (such as a lake, reservoir, or estuary).
demersal

demersal  

Applied to fish that live close to the sea floor, e.g. the cod (Gadus morrhua), hake (Merluccius merluccius), and saithe (Pollachius virens).
depositional environment

depositional environment  

Any part of the environment in which sediment is deposited, such as a lake, coast, or river.
destratification

destratification  

The mixing of water within a lake or reservoir in order to reduce or remove separate layers (for example of temperature or aquatic organisms). Contrast stratification.
dredging

dredging  

The process of excavating, creating, or altering a water body such as a river, lake, or estuary, by scooping or sucking up sediment from the bed in order to deepen it.
ecosystem

ecosystem  

An assemblage of interacting populations of species grouped into communities in a local environment. Ecosystems vary greatly in size (e.g., a small pool vs. a giant reef). See biome.
epilimnion

epilimnion  

The upper, warm, circulating water in a thermally stratified lake in summer. Usually it forms a layer that is thin compared to the hypolimnion.Epilimnion
geochemistry of lakes

geochemistry of lakes  

The sources of dissolved solids in lake water are in many respects those of dissolved solids in rivers. The chemistry of the two parts of a freshwater lake, the epilimnion ...
Great Lakes

Great Lakes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The five connected lakes along the border of the USA and Canada which make up the world's largest body of freshwater. They are Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, and Lake Huron.
hydrological unit

hydrological unit  

A drainage basin or a subdivision of one, such as an aquifer, soil zone, lake, reservoir, or irrigation project.
hydrosere

hydrosere  

(hydrarch succession)A sequence of communities that reflects the developmental stages in a plant succession which commences on a soil submerged by fresh water.
hydrosphere

hydrosphere  

The portion of the Earth's surface that consists of water, as distinct from the solid, rocky lithosphere and the gaseous atmosphere. It is also generally taken to include the cryosphere.
ice shelf

ice shelf  

The outer part of an ice cap or ice sheet that extends into and over the sea. It typically ends in a cliff that may be 30 m high, and the total ice thickness may be 200 m. Ice wastage is by calving ...
inflow

inflow  

1 The natural flow of water into a lake or reservoir from upstream tributaries.2 The flow of rainwater into a sewer system from drains and sewers.
inland waters

inland waters  

Waterbodies (such as lakes, streams, rivers, canals, waterways, inlets, and bays) that have no direct access to the ocean.
kettle hole

kettle hole  

Depression in the surface of glacial drift (especially ablation or kettle moraine), resulting from the melting of an included ice mass. It may be filled with water to form a small lake (‘kettle ...
lacustrine

lacustrine  

Of lakes, especially in connection with sedimentary deposition. Lacustrine plains result from the in-filling of a lake. Soil parent materials are usually fine grained, well sorted, and often varved. ...
lacustrine deposit

lacustrine deposit  

Sediment that has been deposited in a lake.
lake breeze

lake breeze  

A wind that blows onshore from the surface of a large lake, which is caused by the difference in the rates of heating of water and land. A type of local convective wind.

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