Overview

John Keats

(1795—1821) poet

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-20 of 106 entries

  • Type: Overview Page x
clear all

View:

Adonais

Adonais  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
The name given by Shelley to Keats in the pastoral elegy Adonais (1821), written on the death of Keats, and likening him to the Greek god of beauty and fertility; the origin of the name Adonais is ...
Anatomy of Melancholy

Anatomy of Melancholy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
By Robert Burton (1621; enlarged 1621–51). In appearance the Anatomy is a medical work, in effect an affectionate satire on the inefficacy of human learning and endeavour. Burton finds melancholy to ...
Andrew Motion

Andrew Motion  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1952– ),poet, born in London, educated at University College, Oxford, where he won the Newdigate Prize. His first collection, mostly lyrical in character and showing the influence of Larkin, The ...
Auguste Villiers De L'isle-Adam

Auguste Villiers De L'isle-Adam  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Comte de (1838–89)French novelist and dramatist. His best‐known work, the visionary drama Axël (1890; trans. 1925), which first appeared in symbolist reviews and which John Keats read in French ...
ballad

ballad  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A poem or song narrating a story in short stanzas. Traditional ballads are typically of unknown authorship, having been passed on orally from one generation to the next as part of the folk culture. ...
Benjamin Britten

Benjamin Britten  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
(b Lowestoft, 1913; d Aldeburgh, 1976).Eng. composer, pianist, conductor. His birth on St Cecilia's Day, 22 Nov., was a happy augury for the career of one of Britain's greatest composers. Essentially ...
Benjamin Robert Haydon

Benjamin Robert Haydon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1786–1846).A historical painter, born in Plymouth, the son of a painter and publisher, Haydon is now chiefly remembered for his Autobiography and Memoirs, published in 1853.
Blackwood's Magazine

Blackwood's Magazine  

(1817–1980),or ‘the Maga’, was an innovating monthly periodical begun by W. Blackwood as a Tory rival to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review. It began in April 1817 as the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine and in ...
Boris Pasternak

Boris Pasternak  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1890–1960),Russian poet and prose writer. His world‐wide fame is based on his novel Doctor Zhivago (1957), a work which he intended to be his testament, a witness to the experience of the Russian ...
cave

cave  

A large, natural, underground hollow, usually with a horizontal opening. Karst caves result from solution and corrosion; see Miller (2006) GSA Special Paper 404.
Charles Brockden Brown

Charles Brockden Brown  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1771–1810),acclaimed as the first professional American author, is remembered for his four Gothic novels Wieland (1798), Arthur Mervyn (1799), Ormond (1799), and Edgar Huntly (1799). Although ...
Charles Cowden Clarke

Charles Cowden Clarke  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1787–1877)The son of John Keats's enlightened schoolmaster John Clarke, and a close friend of the poet. Keats's ‘Epistle to Charles Cowden‐Clarke’ is full of affection and gratitude. Cowden‐Clarke ...
Charles Jeremiah Wells

Charles Jeremiah Wells  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1800–79),author (under the pseudonym of H. L. Howard) of Joseph and His Brethren: A Scriptural Drama (1824), a verse play much admired by Rossetti, republished in 1876 with an essay by Swinburne.
Charlotte Smith

Charlotte Smith  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1748–1806),chiefly a novelist, began her career with Elegiac Sonnets (1784). Her novels include Emmeline (1788) and The Old Manor House (1793), which Sir W. Scott, and posterity, considered her best.
Christopher Ricks

Christopher Ricks  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1933– ),literary critic and academic, born in Beckenham, Kent, and educated at Balliol College, Oxford. He taught at the universities of Oxford, Bristol, and Cambridge, before moving to Boston ...
closet drama

closet drama  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A play – often in verse – written to be read rather than performed, such as The Dynasts (1904–8) by Thomas Hardy (which later was adapted for performance by Granville ...
Cockney School

Cockney School  

A term apparently first used in Blackwood's Magazine in Oct. 1817, when Lockhart and his associates began a series of attacks ‘On the Cockney School of Poetry’. Leigh Hunt was the chief target, but ...
critical history

critical history  

Although criticism is strictly the attempt to explain and evaluate works of art in terms other than their own, G. Wilson Knight, in The Wheel of Fire (1930), differentiates between ...
Cupid and Psyche

Cupid and Psyche  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The allegorical centrepiece of the Golden Ass of Apuleius, in which the author blends a familiar folk tale depicting an enchanted suitor and his abandoned bride with a Hellenistic epyllion about the ...
Dan Simmonds

Dan Simmonds  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1948– )American science fiction author, born in Peoria, Illinois. His epic Hyperion (1989) employs literary echoes—including the life of John Keats—to begin a metaphysical space opera. Ilium (2003) ...

View: