Update

Overview

Juvenal

(c. 60—130 ad)

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-20 of 45 entries

View:

A. E. Housman

A. E. Housman  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1859–1936)British poet and classical scholar.The eldest son of a Worcestershire solicitor, Housman was educated at Bromsgrove School. Despite the death of their mother (1870), the family was in ...
Anna Laetitia Barbauld

Anna Laetitia Barbauld  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1743–1825)Née Aikin, poet and editor. Born in Kibworth Harcourt, Leicestershire, she was educated by her mother. Her father, a Nonconformist minister, taught at the Dissenting college at Warrington ...
Atellana

Atellana  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(sc. fabula), in origin a native Italian farce. It was a masked drama, largely improvised, with stock characters. It became a literary form for a short time in the period of Sulla. Atellanae ...
bilingualism

bilingualism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Widespread bilingualism at some level was characteristic of the ancient world. Latin and esp. Greek were the languages of culture and education (in the Roman empire, Latin was the language of law and ...
bread and circuses

bread and circuses  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A term referring to the potential of spectator sports and mass spectacle to divert populations or factions of a population away from the weightier business of politics and society, and to entertain ...
classical literature

classical literature  

(see also classical antiquity; Latin; Geoffrey Chaucer: reading). Medieval writers did not make as strict a distinction between classical and later Latin literature as did the humanists of the ...
Curtius Montanus

Curtius Montanus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(RE 21)was prosecuted under Nero for his satiric poems, at the same time as Thrasea Paetus and Helvidius Priscus were condemned for treason. He was excluded from holding any ...
Democritus

Democritus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(b. c.460 bc),a celebrated Greek philosopher, born at Abdera. He advanced (with Leucippus) the theory that the world was formed by the concourse of atoms, the theory subsequently expounded by ...
gentilesse

gentilesse  

Is the abstract term for the quality expressed by the various meanings of its etymologically related adj. gentil, i.e. (1) ‘of noble birth’ (2) ‘of noble character’ (3) ‘excellent’, ‘superior’ ...
Heliodorus

Heliodorus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A popular surgeon of the time of Juvenal (who lived c. ad 60–140; cf. Juvenal 6. 373), probably from Egypt. He belonged to the Pneumatic school (see Pneumatists).Works(1) ...
John Oldham

John Oldham  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1653–83),is chiefly remembered for his ironical Satire against Virtue (1679) and Satires upon the Jesuits (1681). His Poems and Translations appeared in 1683. Dryden commemorated him and his verse ...
Julius Julia

Julius Julia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Etc. For Roman personal names in ‘J’ (not a letter of the Latin alphabet) see under ‘I’, except for Julian, Justin, Justinian, and Juvenal.
Juvenal

Juvenal (c.55)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,272 words

(c.55 or 60–c.130 ce),

Roman verse satirist. Nothing certain is known about the Roman verse

Juvenal

Juvenal (c. ad 60–136)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

(c. ad 60–136),

the Roman satirist. He is twice mentioned by Chaucer. It is not certain

Juvenal

Juvenal   Reference library

Susanna Morton Braund

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,166 words
Roman satirist. Known primarily for the angry tone of his early Satires, although in later poems he developed an ironical and detached superiority as his satiric strategy. The highly ... More
Juvenal

Juvenal   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

(c. 60–c. 140),

Roman satirist. His sixteen verse satires present a savage attack on the vice and folly of Roman society, chiefly in the reign of the emperor Domitian....

Juvenal

Juvenal   Quick reference

Susanna Morton Braund

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,014 words
Roman satirist. Known primarily for the angry tone of his early Satires, although in later poems he developed an ironical and detached superiority as his satiric strategy. The highly ... More
Juvenal, Decimus Junius

Juvenal, Decimus Junius (ad 55–140)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
30 words

Juvenal's satirical poems denounced the immorality of his time. He contrasted decadence in imperial Rome with the virtues of the

Latin literature

Latin literature  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The standard reference works are in German: (1) M. Schanz, C. Hosius, and G. Krüger, Geschichte der römischen Literatur (in I. von Müller's Handbuch der Altertumswissenschaft): 4th edn., 1: Die ...
Latin metre

Latin metre  

A tradition of writing Latin verses on the quantitative model of those of Classical Greek literature maintained itself from 240 bc down to the end of the western empire. The relation of the so‐called ...

View: