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Justinian

(483—565) Byzantine emperor 527–65

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Agathias

Agathias  

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(‘lawyer’), historian and poet in Constantinople, c.ad 532–c.580. A native of Myrina in Asia Minor, where his father was a rhetor, he was educated at Alexandria and Constantinople, where he later ...
Anastasios I

Anastasios I  

Emperor (from 11 Apr. 491); born Dyrrachion ca.430, died Constantinople 8 or 10 July 518.He was nicknamed Dikoros (“with two pupils”) because his eyes were of different colors. His ...
Anastasius I

Anastasius I  

(d. 598), Patr. of Antioch 559–70 and 593–8. A critic of Justinian I's aphthartodocetism, he was deposed by Justinian II and spent 23 years in exile. A key figure in the dogmatic discussions of the ...
Andrea Alciato

Andrea Alciato  

(1492–1550),Italian jurist and humanist, born in Milan and from 1518 professor of law at Avignon. In 1529 he moved to Bourges, and his four years there shifted the centre ...
Antoine le Conte

Antoine le Conte  

(c.1525–1586),French humanist jurist. He was the editor of the Justinian Corpus iuris civilis, the author of a commentary on the Justinian Institutes (Notae in libros institutionum) and of ...
Aquileia

Aquileia  

On the Adriatic coast, became an important city during the late Roman Empire. According to legend it was evangelized by St Mark, but the beginnings of the Church cannot be traced beyond the 3rd cent. ...
Battle of Carthage

Battle of Carthage  

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The Vandal kingdom of Africa was a former Roman province, conquered by the Vandals in 429. When the Byzantine ally Hilderic was arrested by his cousin Gelimer, Justinian seized the ...
Belisarius

Belisarius  

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[Na]Roman general who campaigned against Persia in ad 527 and ad 540, captured Vandal Africa in ad 533–4, and began the reconquest of Ostrogothic Italy in ad 535. Died ad 565.
Byzantine art

Byzantine art  

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Art produced in or under the influence of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) empire; the empire was founded in ad 330 by Constantine (the first Christian emperor of Rome) and ended in 1453 when the ...
Byzantine Empire

Byzantine Empire  

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Eastern, Greek-speaking part of the Roman Empire from 330 B.C.E. to 1453 C.E. At its height, the Byzantine Empire encompassed the Balkans, Greece, Anatolia, the Levant, and parts of North Africa. In ...
Byzantium

Byzantium  

An ancient Greek city, founded in the 7th century bc, at the southern end of the Bosporus, site of the modern city of Istanbul. It was rebuilt by Constantine the Great in ad 324–30 as Constantinople.
Candlemas

Candlemas  

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Religion
[Ge]A traditional calendar festival in northern Europe celebrated in recent times on 2 February, the Christian feast of the purification of the Virgin Mary.
Cassiodorus

Cassiodorus  

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Politician, writer, and monk (c. ad 490–c.585). His Bruttian family had a tradition of provincial leadership and official service. He assisted his father, praetorian prefect of Italy, 503–7, under ...
Christianity in Nubia

Christianity in Nubia  

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Religion
In the Nile Valley, from the First Cataract south to the area around Khartoum (the region formerly known as Nubia), there was a considerable Christian community from the late 6th to at least the 15th ...
civil law

civil law  

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Law
1 The law of any particular state, now usually called municipal law.2 Roman law.3 A legal system based on Roman law, as distinct from the English system of common law.4 Private law, as opposed to ...
Code Napoléon

Code Napoléon  

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History
The first modern codification of French civil law, issued between 1804 and 1810, which sought, under the direction of J. J. Cambacérès, to reorganize the French legal system. Napoleon himself ...
Codex Canonum Ecclesiae Universae

Codex Canonum Ecclesiae Universae  

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Religion
Under this title C. Justel (1580–1649) published in 1610 an eclectic text which he believed to represent the ‘official’ canon law collection of the early Church, sanctioned by the Council ...
Constantinople

Constantinople  

The former name for Istanbul from ad 330 (when it was given its name by Constantine the Great) to the capture of the city by the Turks in 1453. Constantinople is the anglicized form of ...
contract

contract  

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A legally binding agreement between parties, customarily a written document that has been signed by the parties to the agreement, and preferably witnessed.
Danube Fortifications

Danube Fortifications  

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A large building program was started along the Roman limes (military frontier road) on the Danube during the reigns of Diocletian and Constantine, as a response to the Gothic invasions. ...

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