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Andrew Jackson

(1767—1845) American general and Democratic statesman, 7th President of the US 1829–37

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Adams-Onís Treaty

Adams-Onís Treaty  

An agreement made between the United States and Spain in 1819, in which Spain ceded Florida to the United States and relinquished its claims to Oregon, and the United States ...
American Colonization Society

American Colonization Society  

Founded in the USA in 1817 in order to resettle in Africa free‐born Africans and emancipated slaves. In 1821 the society bought the site of the future Monrovia, Liberia, which it controlled until ...
antebellum

antebellum  

Occurring or existing before a particular war, especially the American Civil War.
Anti-Masonic Party

Anti-Masonic Party  

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History
A US political party of the 1820s and 1830s opposed to Freemasons. Formed in 1826 in the wake of the disappearance of William Morgan, a New York bricklayer alleged to have divulged lodge secrets, the ...
Antonio López de Santa Anna

Antonio López de Santa Anna  

(1794–1876)Mexican military adventurer and statesman. He entered the Spanish colonial army and served as one of the Creole supporters of the Spanish government until 1821, when Iturbide made him ...
Assassination

Assassination  

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The premeditated murder of a political figure for reasons associated with the victim's prominence, political perspective, or some combination of both is known as assassination. As a formal means of ...
Bank of the United States

Bank of the United States  

Between 1791 and 1811 and again from 1816 to 1836, the U.S. government created and operated a national bank that by most historical assessments met the nation's financial needs effectively. But the ...
Battle of Cross Keys

Battle of Cross Keys  

A minor Civil War battle on June 8, 1862, at Cross Keys, Virginia, in Andrew Jackson's Shenandoah Valley Campaign. The Confederates were victorious.
Battle of Horseshoe Bend

Battle of Horseshoe Bend  

(March 27–28, 1814) a battle in the Creek War (1811–14) between U.S. forces and the Creek in present-day Alabama. In response to U.S. intervention in Creek government, the Red Stick ...
Battle of New Orleans

Battle of New Orleans  

(8 January 1815)A battle in the War of 1812, fought outside the city of New Orleans. A numerically superior British attempt led by Sir Edward Pakenham to seize New Orleans was brilliantly repelled by ...
Black Codes and Slave Codes, Colonial

Black Codes and Slave Codes, Colonial  

In the colonial and early national periods most slave jurisdictions developed elaborate systems of law for the regulation of blacks. These were generally known as slave codes, although they usually ...
Briscoe v. Bank of the Commonwealth of Kentucky

Briscoe v. Bank of the Commonwealth of Kentucky  

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Subject:
Law
11 Pet. (36 U.S.) 257 (1837), argued 28 Jan., 1 Feb. 1837, decided 11 Feb. 1837 by vote of 6 to 1; McLean for the Court, Story in dissent. With the death of John Marshall in 1835, the Supreme Court's ...
caucuses, congressional

caucuses, congressional  

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The congressional caucus was a method of nominating Presidential candidates used by the Federalist party in 1800 and the Democratic-Republican party between 1800 and 1824.Borrowing the word from the ...
censure

censure  

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By censuring one of its members, Congress formally rebukes that person for wrong doing. However, members who are censured do not lose their seat, their committee assignments, or their seniority. ...
Charles River Bridge v. Warren Bridge

Charles River Bridge v. Warren Bridge  

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Subject:
Law
• 11 Pet. 420 (1837)• Vote: 4–3• For the Court: Taney• Dissenting: McLean, Story, and ThompsonIn 1828, the state government of Massachusetts granted a charter, or permit, for construction of ...
Cherokee Cases

Cherokee Cases  

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Subject:
Law
(1831 and 1832).The U.S. Supreme Court's decisions in Cherokee Nation v. Georgia (1831) and Worcester v. Georgia (1832), often referred to as the Cherokee Cases, considered the status of ...
Civil Service Reform.

Civil Service Reform.  

Early nineteenth-century Americans, with the widest suffrage in the world and many offices to be filled by election, invented mass-based political parties to nominate and elect candidates. Since ...
Civil-Military Relations

Civil-Military Relations  

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Americans have traditionally been suspicious of military governance, a distrust that stems from their belief in individual liberty, representative government, and civilian control of the military. ...
Commander in Chief

Commander in Chief  

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Article 2, Section 2, of the Constitution refers to the President as “Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the ...
Commemoration and Public Ritual

Commemoration and Public Ritual  

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The memory of past wars has played a central role in creating and defining American national identity. After the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776, Independence Day became ...

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