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languages of Italy

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Faliscans

Faliscans  

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The iron age inhabitants of the Treia basin, and the northern neighbours of Veii. They spoke a ‘distinct and special language’ (Strabo 5. 2. 9), akin to Latin, but were ...
Hernici

Hernici  

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Inhabited the Trerus valley and hills north of it in Italy (Strabo. 5. 231: inaccurate). Their treaty with Rome in regal times is possibly apocryphal (Dionysius Halicarnassensis Antiquitates Romanae ...
Historical Linguistics

Historical Linguistics  

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This entry includes the following subentries:OverviewClassification by “Descent”Culture History and Historical LinguisticsMethodsMathematical MethodsComputational MethodsTextual MethodsObsolescence, ...
Indo-European

Indo-European  

Of or relating to the family of languages spoken over the greater part of Europe and Asia as far as northern India.The Indo-European languages have a history of over 3,000 years. Their unattested, ...
Indo-European and Indo-Europeans

Indo-European and Indo-Europeans  

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Languages such as Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit share regularities which indicate a close historical relationship (see linguistics). This grouping, termed Indo‐European (IE) to indicate its geographical ...
Latin

Latin  

(as pronounced by singers and liturgists) Because Latin was not a primary language for anyone in the late MA, its pronunciation differed in a number of ways from that of ...
Oscan

Oscan  

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Are the principal representatives of a group of closely related languages belonging to the Italic branch of Indo-European. The usual name for this group is ‘Osco-Umbrian’ but a less cumbersome ...
Oscans

Oscans  

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An extinct Italic language of southern Italy, related to Umbrian and surviving in inscriptions mainly of the 4th to 1st centuries bc.
religion, Italic

religion, Italic  

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In a strict sense this concept refers to religions of various Indo-European tribes forming the Italic linguistic league, Umbrians, Sabello-Oscans (Sabines, Samnites, and a number of others such as ...
Sabelli

Sabelli  

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Is not synonymous with Sabini. It is the Roman name for speakers of Oscan. They called themselves Safineis and their chief official meddix. They expanded from their original habitat (reputedly ...
Sabines

Sabines  

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People of ancient Italy. The Sabines occupied an area to the NE of Rome along the east side of the Tiber valley and extending to the Apennine uplands. They play an important part in the legends of ...
Umbrians

Umbrians  

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The word ‘Umbrian’ has been used by ancient and modern authors to denote a variety of ethnic, linguistic, cultural, and geographical entities. Pliny (1) (Naturalis historia 3. 14. 112) refers ...
Venetic language

Venetic language  

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The Veneti (2) learnt to write from the Etruscans during the 6th cent. bc and some 250 to 300 inscriptions survive, mostly votive or funerary, all quite short (none has ...
Volsci

Volsci  

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People of ancient Italy. It seems that in the early 5th cent. bc they overran Latium and occupied the Monti Lepini, most of the Pomptine plain, and the coastal region from Antium to Tarracina. During ...

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