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Innocent III

(1160—1216)

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abbess

abbess  

The head of certain autonomous houses of nuns. The title is used among Benedictines, Cistercians, Trappists, Poor Clares, and some canonesses. The earliest known instance is in 514. In the Middle ...
Abbey of Beaulieu

Abbey of Beaulieu  

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Religion
This Cistercian abbey in Hampshire was founded and endowed in 1204 by King John for 30 monks from Cîteaux, and dedicated in 1246 in the presence of Henry III and ...
Agnolo Torini

Agnolo Torini  

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Literature
(c.1315–98).Florentine layman and clothworker, who was also a poet and the author of two religious prose treatises: Brieve collezione della miseria della umana condizione (based on Innocent III's De ...
Agnus Dei

Agnus Dei  

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Religion
(Lat., ‘Lamb of God’).The hymn derived from John 1. 29 sung or said during or after the breaking of the bread at communion in W. churches.
Albert of Buxhövden

Albert of Buxhövden  

(died 1229)A canon, then bishop of Bremen in 1199, Albert was one of the architects and executors of Ostsiedlung (German colonization of the territories east of the Elbe).When ...
Albert of Jerusalem

Albert of Jerusalem  

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Religion
(c.1150–1214)*Canon Regular of Mortara, bishop of Bobbio (1184), of Vercelli (1185–1205), and Patriarch of Jerusalem (1205–14). He legislated for the canons of Biella and in 1201 for the Humiliati. ...
Albigenses

Albigenses  

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Religion
A medieval term for the inhabitants of parts of S. France applied to the heretics who were strong there in the late 12th and early 13th cents. They were a branch of the Cathars. They were condemned ...
Anagni

Anagni  

An ancient city of pre-Roman origin (capital of the Ernici), situated south-east of Rome. An episcopal see from the 5th c. (probably founded by Leo the Great), its ecclesiastical and ...
Balts

Balts  

The Balts, who reached the banks of the Baltic around 500 bc, are among the oldest Indo-European peoples. From the time of the departure of the Goths, Pomeranians and Pruthenians ...
Basil Pediadites

Basil Pediadites  

Writer, metropolitan of Kerkyra (from 1201); died Kerkyra ca.1219. Browning (“Patriarchal School” 21) proposed the identification of Basil Pediadites (Πεδιαδίτης) with Basil Hagiopanton, a teacher at ...
Benedictine

Benedictine  

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History
A monk or nun of an order following the rule of St Benedict. From the original Benedictine foundations at Subiaco and Monte Cassino in Italy the number of monastic houses in Europe grew to many ...
Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bosnia and Herzegovina  

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History
The northern half of the state of Bosnia‐Hercegovina since 1580. The term is generally used as an abbreviation for the entire state since its independence in 1992.
capitulations, electoral

capitulations, electoral  

From the 12th c., at episcopal elections, certain colleges of canons imposed a “capitulation” on the elect, obliging him to follow a certain policy and renounce certain rights. This custom ...
cardinal

cardinal  

A high church official, appointed by the pope. The cardinals (from Latin cardo, ‘hinge’) were defined as a ‘sacred college’ with clearly defined functions in the 11th century, when they ...
Casamari

Casamari  

The foundation of the Cistercian abbey of Santa Maria di Casamari, in the diocese of Veroli, on the road from Sora to Frosinone, in the shelter of a hill lapped ...
Catholic

Catholic  

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Religion
The word, meaning ‘general’ or ‘universal’, has come to have various uses in Christian terminology: (1) Of the universal Church as distinct from local Christian communities.(2) In the sense of ...
censures

censures  

Censures were ecclesiastical Sanctions depriving Christians (clerical or lay) of certain spiritual benefits. “Medicinal” penalties, they lasted only until the amendment of the guilty. Three are ...
Christendom

Christendom  

The worldwide body or society of Christians; the Christian world. The word is recorded from Old English (in form crīstendōm), and comes from crīsten ‘Christian’ + -dōm ‘domain’.
churching

churching  

The formal thanksgiving by women after childbirth, based on the Jewish rite of Purification and first mentioned in a letter of St Augustine of Canterbury to St Gregory the Great.
colours, liturgical

colours, liturgical  

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Religion
A sequence of colours at different seasons of the ecclesiastical year for vestments and other liturgical objects is first found in the use of the Augustinian Canons at Jerusalem in the early 12th ...

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