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Angelman syndrome

Angelman syndrome  

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Overview Page
A neurogenetic disorder characterized by severe developmental delay, absence of speech, seizures, a jerky puppet-like gait (see ataxia), and paroxysmal laughter (giving it the alternative name happy ...
attachment

attachment  

n. 1. (in psychology) the process of developing the first close selective relationship of a child’s life, most commonly with the mother. The relationship acts to reduce anxiety in strange settings ...
critical learning period

critical learning period  

The crucial time in the development of an organism when the ideal combination of sensory, motor, psychological, and motivational factors is present for learning a specified behaviour. Critical ...
critical period

critical period  

A biologically determined stage of development at which a person or animal is optimally ready to acquire some pattern of behaviour. See also imprinting.
cultural

cultural  

Applied to the transmission of information from one generation of animals to another by non-genetic means (e.g. by imprinting or imitation). Behaviour may be modified culturally, so that while ...
cultural behaviour

cultural behaviour  

Behaviour that has been passed from one generation to another by non-genetic means. Evolution occurs primarily as a result of natural selection, and genetic inheritance of acquired characteristics is ...
dialect

dialect  

Vocalizations among a population of animals that differ from those of another population of the same species. There are many dialects in bird-song.
ethology

ethology  

The scientific study of the behaviour of animals in their normal environment, including all the processes, both internal and external, by which they respond to changes in their environment.
following behaviour

following behaviour  

In ethology, the trailing of a young bird or animal behind its parent or another organism or object, especially as a consequence of imprinting.
habitat

habitat  

The place in which an organism lives, which is characterized by its physical features or by the dominant plant types. Freshwater habitats, for example, include streams, ponds, rivers, and lakes. See ...
incest

incest  

Prohibited sexual intercourse between close relatives. See also incest taboo, genetic sexual attraction. [From Latin incestus incest, from in- not+castus chaste or pure]
innate behaviour

innate behaviour  

An inherited pattern of behaviour that appears in a similar form in all normally reared individuals of the same sex and species. See instinct.
juvenile behaviour

juvenile behaviour  

The behaviour of sexually immature animals. Like adult behaviour, this is subject to natural selection. Although some aspects of juvenile behaviour are precursors of adult behaviour, other aspects ...
kin Recognition

kin Recognition  

The ability to recognize individuals to which one is genetically related. This is often the result of early experience. For example, Belding's ground squirrels (Citellus beldingi) are born ...
Konrad Lorenz

Konrad Lorenz  

(1903–89)An Austrian zoologist who was joint winner (with Karl von Frisch and Nikolaas Tinbergen) of the 1973 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their studies of animal behaviour. Lorenz ...
learning

learning  

The acquisition of information or patterns of behaviour other than by genetic inheritance, or the modification of genetically acquired information or behaviour as a result of experience. See also ...
learning, perceptual

learning, perceptual  

Perceptual learning is the relatively permanent improvement in detecting, discriminating, or categorizing sensory stimuli through experience (e.g. Fahle and Poggio 2002). Thus, perceptual learning is ...
ontogeny

ontogeny  

The development of an individual from fertilization of the egg to adulthood.
parental behaviour

parental behaviour  

Behaviour that aids the development of offspring. Rudimentary forms of parental behaviour may involve simply placing the eggs in a sheltered or secure location, and leaving them to develop unaided. ...
Prader-Willi syndrome

Prader-Willi syndrome  

(Prader-Willi-Labhart syndrome) a congenital condition that is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and is due to an abnormality of chromosome 15 (see imprinting). It is marked by pathological ...

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