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Hospitallers

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Acre

Acre  

Ancient port on the eastern Mediterranean shore. It was lost by Byzantium to Chosroes II in 614, briefly regained, and lost to the Arabs in 638. Conquered in 1104 during ...
Beirut

Beirut  

Ancient Phoenician city, a bishopric by the late 4th century, it also had a famous law school. Damaged by earthquake in 551, the city was captured by the Arabs in ...
Brothers Hospitallers

Brothers Hospitallers  

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Religion
The Order, whose members are mostly laymen, developed out of the work for the sick of St John of God (d. 1550). In 1572 Pius V approved the Order, which adopted the Augustinian Rule.
Celestine III

Celestine III  

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Religion
(c.1106–98), Pope from 1191. He defended Abelard at the Council of Sens (1140) and later urged Thomas Becket to adopt a less intransigent attitude. Elected Pope in his 85th year, his reign was marked ...
chapter

chapter  

The members of a Christian religious community or of any similar body. From the 9th cent. cathedrals often had separate ‘chapter houses’.
Clement V

Clement V  

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Religion
(1264–1314), Pope from 1305. Bertrand de Got came of an influential French family. His policy was largely subservient to French influence, which increased when he fixed the Papal residence at Avignon ...
commandery

commandery  

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[MC]1 A small monastic house of the military orders.2 A military establishment constructed as the base from which newly conquered areas were administered during the Han Dynasty in China.
Comtat Venaissin

Comtat Venaissin  

The Comitatus Venassinus, or marquisate of Provence – the county of Provence being south of the Durance – was a product of the treaties of 1125 between the count of ...
Council of Vienne

Council of Vienne  

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Religion
(1311–12). Accounted the 15th Oecumenical Council by RCs, it was summoned by Clement V primarily to deal with the question of the Templars, who were being accused of heresy and immorality. The ...
crusades

crusades  

Western Christendom organized several Crusades between 1095 and 1269 to capture the Holy Land from the Muslims. During the 13th century Muslim armies recaptured all their lost territories.
Franco of Cologne

Franco of Cologne  

(fl. late 13th century)*Music theorist who described a notation system assigning precise values to note shapes, a musical notation that remained in use, with modifications, for several centuries. His ...
Gregory XI

Gregory XI  

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Religion
(1329–78), Pope from 1370. Elected Pope at Avignon, he was persuaded to return to Italy by St Catherine of Siena. He entered Rome in 1377 but could not end the disturbances. He condemned the teaching ...
Hans Tausen

Hans Tausen  

(1494–1561), Reformer, the ‘Danish Luther’. He was a Hospitaller, but came under the influence of M. Luther when studying at Wittenberg. On his return to Denmark he was imprisoned for teaching novel ...
Hereford

Hereford  

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Literature
The see was founded in 676 by Putta, Bp. of Rochester, who had fled from the heathen invaders of his diocese. St Ethelbert, King of the East Angles, was buried in the cathedral and, with the BVM, ...
inns

inns  

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Overview Page
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History
[MC]An establishment which provided food, drink, stabling, and, usually, accommodation for travellers. Inns commonly stand along main highways and in market towns.
John of Brienne

John of Brienne  

(c.1144–1237)John of Brienne was king of Jerusalem from 1212 to 1225 by his marriage to Mary, heiress to the crown. During his reign, the monarchical power weakened in comparison ...
Kalavryta

Kalavryta  

(Καλάβρυτα, “beautiful spring”; Colovrate, etc., in Western texts), city in the borderland between Achaia and Arkadia, located in a high and nearly inaccessible plain near ancient Kynaitha, unknown ...
Kos

Kos  

(Κω̑ς), island in the Dodekanese north of Rhodes. In late antiquity it was second city of the province of the Islands. The bishop of Kos was suffragan of Rhodes; bishops ...
Latin states of the East

Latin states of the East  

The main political consequence of the crusades was the creation of Latin states in the East: in Syria-Palestine following the first crusade, at Cyprus during the third, in the Balkan peninsula after ...
Leo II/I

Leo II/I  

(Arm. Lewon), successor of his brother Ruben III as Rubenid prince Leo II (1187–1198/9), then first king of Armenian Cilicia as Leo I (1198/9–1219). Leo successfully fought the Turkomans and ...

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