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agriculture

agriculture  

The practice of cultivating the soil, growing crops, or raising livestock for human use, including the production of food, feed, fibre, fuel, or other useful products. Also known as farming. See also ...
animal

animal  

Animal Farm a fable (1945) by George Orwell which consists of a satire on Russian Communism as it developed under Stalin. The animals of the farm, led by the pigs, revolt against the cruel farmer, ...
Animal Husbandry

Animal Husbandry  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Concerned not only with ‘domestic animals,’ but also bees and silkworms. Throughout the MA, animals for the most part were allowed to wander free; thus horses, for example, were often ...
animals and the military

animals and the military  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(see also horses). Man has made use of the strength, speed, and stamina of his companion animals, in war as well as in peace, from the earliest recorded times. Domesticated ...
armoured warfare

armoured warfare  

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Overview Page
The trade-off between survivability and mobility on the battlefield has been a feature of warfare since the beginning of recorded history: indeed, one can imagine primitive man pondering the merits ...
‘Banjo’ Paterson

‘Banjo’ Paterson  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1864–1941),Australian writer, born on a bush station in New South Wales; he trained as a solicitor. The author of ‘Waltzing Matilda’, he grew up in the bush and had ...
Barding (Horse Armor)

Barding (Horse Armor)  

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Although it became common in the later twelfth century to cover a knight’s steed with a large flowing cloth called a “caparison,” the first horse armor, the mail trapper, protecting ...
Beasts of Burden

Beasts of Burden  

(sing. ὑποζύγιον). To transport loads, the Byz. used animals, since in mountainous areas the cart could not always be employed. Horses were rarely used for transport or cartage; the main ...
Bucephalas

Bucephalas  

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Overview Page
Alexander (3) the Great's favourite Thessalian horse, bought for thirteen talents and broken in by Alexander himself; named after his ox-head brandmark. Alexander gave the name Bucephala to a city ...
camel

camel  

The camel can survive for long periods without food or drink, chiefly by using up the fat reserves in its hump; from this comes the name ship of the desert.Camels are the emblem of the 4th-century ...
Cart

Cart  

(ἃμαξα). Unlike the light chariot pulled by Horses that was employed for Chariot Races and solemn processions, the cart was a heavy vehicle dragged by oxen and used for everyday ...
cattle

cattle  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
[Sp]The domesticated form of the aurochs (Bos primigenius) that was probably tamed in a number of different places independently, defined as Bos taurus but probably the same species as the wild form ...
Chariot Mounts and Horse Fittings

Chariot Mounts and Horse Fittings  

Bronze chariot mounts, formed of an ornamented double ring mounted on a socket, have been described as rein guides or “shock absorber” supports; several examples attributed to the 4th C. ...
Domestication of Animals

Domestication of Animals  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
The domestication of animals involves a shift in the relationship between hunters and their prey. Successful hunting of wild game using traditional weapons, such as bows and arrows, spears, and ...
donkey

donkey  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Equus asinus, a close relative of the horse. The female is referred to as a jennet, the male as a jack. See Equus, horse-donkey hybrids.
Draft and Pack Animals

Draft and Pack Animals  

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Overview Page
Before mechanization, animals were the most important form of physical capital. For centuries, both draft and pack animals were the primary means of transportation and the source of raw power ...
Energy

Energy  

Was spoken of by colonial Australians mainly as a synonym for human effort: for example, they would speak with admiration of the ‘energy and enterprise’ demonstrated by settlers in clearing ...
Equidae

Equidae  

The horse family and its extinct ancestors. Living species include the domesticated horse, Equus caballus; the donkey, E. asinus; and three species of zebras. The earliest horse genus in the fossil ...
Equus

Equus  

The genus that contains two domesticated species: E. caballus, the horse (2N = 64), and E. asinus, the donkey (2N = 62). E. przewalskii, the Asiatic wild horse or taki (2N = 66), can produce fertile ...
farming

farming  

As defined by the Income Tax (Trading and Other Income) Act 2005, the occupation of land wholly or mainly for the purpose of husbandry (which is declared not to include market gardening). Special tax ...

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