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homeostasis

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acid–base homeostasis

acid–base homeostasis  

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All living things depend on water. Life consists of a highly complex series of chemical reactions occurring in aqueous media. Among the most important factors in the composition of these ...
adjustment

adjustment  

Change or adaptation within a system that serves to accommodate the factor(s) that are promoting the change and produce a new equilibrium. A system changes when it is forced to, otherwise it tends to ...
autonomic nervous system

autonomic nervous system  

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That part of the nervous system that controls and regulates involuntary body functions (e.g. digestion, heart rate, and temperature regulation). It is divided up into the sympathetic and ...
body fluids

body fluids  

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A term that includes blood, tears, sweat, serous and mucous secretions from all bodily orifices, saliva, urine, and semen. In clinical usage, the term refers to body fluids that can transmit ...
breathing

breathing  

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(breeth-ing)the alternation of active inhalation of air into the lungs through the mouth or nose with the passive exhalation of the air. Breathing is part of respiration and is sometimes called ...
calcium

calcium  

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(kal-siŭm)a metallic element that is an important constituent of bones, teeth, and blood. It is also essential for many metabolic processes, including nerve function, muscle contraction, and blood ...
Claude Bernard

Claude Bernard  

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(1813–1878)French physiologist who formulated the principle of homeostasis, the physiological self-corrective mechanism that “automatically” seeks to restore the normal internal bodily environment ...
closed-loop control

closed-loop control  

In cybernetics, a control process in which a system's output is returned to its input as feedback, this being characteristic of controlled processing and all homeostatic processes. Compare open-loop ...
control mechanism

control mechanism  

Any mechanism that regulates a biological process, such as a metabolic pathway or enzyme-controlled reaction, or that helps to maintain the internal environment (see homeostasis). See also feedback.
cybernetics

cybernetics  

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The study of communications systems and of system control in animals and machines. In the life sciences, it also includes the study of feedback controls in homoeostasis.
drinking

drinking  

Taking in water by mouth to quench thirst. Many aquatic animals take water in through the mouth, but this may play no role in homeostasis. True drinking applies to terrestrial animals that take in ...
excretion

excretion  

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The natural removal of metabolic waste products, water, mineral salts, and carbon dioxide from the body. It occurs through the kidneys, lungs, and sweat glands.
feedback

feedback  

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The process by which knowledge acquired from past experiences informs and alters actors' choices when they encounter similar situations. It is a central concept of cybernetics and information theory.
feeding

feeding  

All behaviour that involves the obtaining, manipulation, and ingestion of food. Compare foraging.
glia

glia  

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(neuroglia) n. the special connective tissue of the central nervous system, composed of different cells, including the oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, ependymal cells (see ependyma), and microglia, ...
glucostatic theory

glucostatic theory  

A homeostatic theory of hunger, according to which the brain monitors the difference between the levels of glucose in the arteries and veins as an index of the rate of glucose removal from the blood. ...
homeostasis

homeostasis   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
1,358 words
Illustration(s):
1

(Greek: staying the same) is a fundamental idea in our understanding of the workings of the body. The concept had

homeostasis

homeostasis   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
The ability or tendency to maintain a constant physical or chemical state within a system using compensatory control mechanisms. Physiological homeostasis is illustrated by the maintenance ... More
homeostasis

homeostasis   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
32 words

the maintenance of a relatively constant internal environment in the bodies of higher animals by means of a series of

homeostasis

homeostasis   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
294 words

The main concept of homeostasis is the principle of negative feedback control, which was developed for military purposes in the

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