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Animal Combat

Animal Combat  

(του̑ θεάτρου κυνήγια). The exhibition of animals at the circus games, the so-called venationes, was popular in ancient Rome, but it seems that by the 4th C. large-scale shows were ...
Arkadios

Arkadios  

(᾽Αρκάδιος), emperor in the East (395–408); born Constantinople 377/8, died Constantinople 1 May 408.The son of Theodosios I and Aelia Flaccilla, he became augustus in 383. Left as regent ...
Baths of Zeuxippos

Baths of Zeuxippos  

The most famous public baths of Constantinople, the baths of Zeuxippos (Ζεύξιππος) were allegedly built by Septimius Severus and enlarged by Constantine I. Situated close to the Great Palace by ...
bronze

bronze  

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Alloy of copper and tin used for architectural ornament, doors and door-furniture, funerary monuments, grilles and railings, wall-plaques (commemorative or not), window-frames, etc. It is also used ...
Byzantion

Byzantion  

(Βυζάντιον, also Βυζαντίς), name of a Megarian colony at the southern mouth of the Bosporos, reportedly founded ca.660 b.c. The word is of Thracian origin; cf. the town of Bizye ...
chariot racing

chariot racing  

A form of horse racing immensely popular in the ancient civilizations of Greece, Rome, and Byzantium, with some predecessors in the privileged cultures of earlier civilizations, such as in Syria, ...
Charioteers

Charioteers  

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Religion
Charioteers often have symbolic importance, especially in Hindu mythology. As the driver of the hero's vehicle of war, the charioteer is more a guide than a servant. In fact, he ...
Chrysotriklinos

Chrysotriklinos  

(Ξρυσοτρίκλινος, “golden hall”), a hall in the Great Palace, probably constructed at the end of the 6th C. A domed octagon lit by 16 windows, the Chrysotriklinos was the place ...
circus

circus  

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Overview Page
In Roman times a place of exhibition for chariot racing and athletic and gladiatorial contests. In its modern sense it dates from the mid-18th century. Mainly itinerant, it is performed ...
cities

cities  

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History
A large, densely populated urban settlement, larger than a town, which can include two or more independent administrative districts within it and usually has suburbs.
Constantinople

Constantinople  

The former name for Istanbul from ad 330 (when it was given its name by Constantine the Great) to the capture of the city by the Turks in 1453. Constantinople is the anglicized form of ...
coronation

coronation  

As formal acknowledgement of a monarch's right to rule, the coronation confirms their accession and acceptance by their subjects. For early warrior kings, the principle of succession was by election ...
Demarchos

Demarchos  

(δήμαρχος), a term designating the leader of a circus faction. The demarchoi played a prominent role in the Hippodrome and in imperial ceremonial, at least until the 10th C. The ...
Euphemia, Church of Saint

Euphemia, Church of Saint  

Built in the 4th C. at the place of her burial, about 1.5 km from Chalcedon. It consisted of a basilica with an attached circular martyrion in which the body ...
Factions

Factions  

(from Lat. factio; Gr. μέρος, δη̑μος or δη̑μοι, δημόται; sometimes used as technical term), associations that staged circus games; associations of partisans of any one of the four colors inherited ...
Great Palace

Great Palace  

(Μέγα παλάτιος), the imperial palace of Constantinople situated on a sloping site between the Hippodrome and the sea walls. Built or begun by Constantine I, it remained the actual residence ...
Greek Anthology

Greek Anthology  

Conventional title for two collections of ancient and Byz. epigrams.1. Anthologia Palatina, the name given to a collection of about 3,700 epigrams contained in a unique MS, now divided between ...
kathisma

kathisma  

The Byzantine Psalter is divided into twenty sections; the term ‘kathisma’ is used to designate both these sections and the brief liturgical hymn sung at the end of each of them during Orthros.
Kiev

Kiev  

Located on the river Dnieper, on the trade routes from central Europe and the Baltic to Byzantium and the Arab caliphates, Kiev had been settled for several centuries before Varangian ...
obelisk

obelisk  

A stone pillar, typically having a square or rectangular cross section, set up as a monument or landmark, originally in ancient Egypt. Recorded from the mid 16th century, the word comes via Latin ...

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