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Hesiod

(c. 700 bc) Greek poet

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Acusilaus

Acusilaus  

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Of Argos, lived ‘before the Persian Wars’ (Josephus Contra Apionem 1–13) and compiled genealogies, translating and correcting Hesiod, with ingenious conjectures but no literary merit.Fragmente der ...
agōnĕs

agōnĕs  

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1 The term agōn and its derivatives can denote the informal and extempore rivalries that permeated Greek life in the general fight for survival and, success esp. philosophical, legal, and public ...
Alcaeus

Alcaeus  

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Greek lyric poet, of Mytilene on Lesbos. Probably b. c.625–620 bc, since he was old enough to participate in the struggle against Athens for Sigeum, in which Pittacus distinguished himself. Lesbian ...
animal

animal  

Animal Farm a fable (1945) by George Orwell which consists of a satire on Russian Communism as it developed under Stalin. The animals of the farm, led by the pigs, revolt against the cruel farmer, ...
anthropology

anthropology  

In philosophical usage, a general theory of human nature, sometimes thought to be the necessary foundation of history and all social sciences. The philosophy of anthropology considers such issues as ...
Aphrodite

Aphrodite  

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In Greek mythology, the goddess of beauty, fertility, and sexual love. She is variously described as the daughter of Zeus and Dione, or as being born from the sea. Her cult was of Eastern origin, ...
Apollo

Apollo  

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In Greek mythology, a god, son of Zeus and Leto and brother of Artemis. He is associated with music, poetic inspiration, archery, prophecy, medicine, pastoral life, and the sun; the sanctuary at ...
Apollonius of Rhodes

Apollonius of Rhodes  

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Apollonios Rhodios lived in Alexandria in the third and second centuries b.c.e. and eventually became head of the great library there. He wrote the story of the voyage of the Argonauts and the Golden ...
Archestratus

Archestratus  

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Of Gela, mid-4th-cent. bc poet. Some 340 hexameters are preserved by Athenaeus (1) from the Hēdupatheia (also cited as Gastronomia Deipnologia, and Opsopoiia), a culinary tour of the Mediterranean, ...
Aristarchus

Aristarchus  

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Of Samothrace (c.216–144 bc), sat at the feet of Aristophanes of Byzantium at Alexandria. He became head of the Alexandrian Library c.153. On the accession of Ptolemy VIII (145) he left Alexandria ...
Aristobulus

Aristobulus  

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Religion
An Alexandrian Jew, probably of the second half of the 2nd cent. bc, author of a commentary on the Pentateuch which is known only through quotations by Clement of Alexandria ...
Aristonicus

Aristonicus  

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Son of Ptolemaeus, an Alexandrian grammarian (see Alexandria (1)) of the Augustan age (Strabo 1. 2. 31). Much of his chief work—on the Aristarchan recensions of Homer (see Aristarchus (2))—is ...
Aristophanes

Aristophanes  

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Of Byzantium (probably c.257–180bc) succeeded Eratosthenes as head of the Alexandrian Library (c.194 bc). He was a scholar of wide learning, famous for his linguistic, literary, textual, and ...
Armenia

Armenia  

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History
A region south of the Caucasus in Asia Minor, comprising the Republic of Armenia (see Armenia, Republic of) but also parts of eastern Turkey and northern Iran. Armenian culture dates from the 6th ...
Art and creation

Art and creation  

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Religion
For most of us, some projection of truth into myth is necessary— especially into narrative and image. “Tell me a story,” says the child to the parent. “Explain it with ...
Asclepius

Asclepius  

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In Greek mythology, a hero and god of healing, son of Apollo, often represented bearing a staff with a serpent coiled round it. He sometimes bears a scroll or tablet, probably representing medical ...
Ascra

Ascra  

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A Greek village in the territory of Thespiae, founded by Diocles and the Aloadae, best known as the home of Hesiod, who defamed it forever by describing it as ‘bad ...
astronomy

astronomy  

Until 1582, the need for Calendar reform was a significant spur to astronomy. Astronomers' reactions to the publication of the Copernican theory (1543) were at first rather friendly (see Rheticus ...
Ate

Ate  

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Mental aberration, infatuation causing irrational behaviour which leads to disaster. A hero's ate is brought about through psychic intervention by a divine agency, usually Zeus, but can also be ...
Atlas

Atlas  

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In Greek mythology a brother of Prometheus who was originally a marine god before Perseus showed him the Gorgon's head and turned him into a rock mountain supporting the heavens. A mythical god, or ...

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