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harbours

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Anthedon

Anthedon  

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Harbour town on the NE coast of Boeotia, known for the legend of Glaucus (4) the fisherman. The remains of circuit-walls and harbour installations can still be seen. Generally a ...
Antium

Antium  

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In Latium. It was occupied from at least the 8th cent. bc by people with a material culture resembling that of Rome itself. It was certainly Latin in the 6th ...
archaeology, underwater

archaeology, underwater  

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The potential richness of the sea for salvage or accidental finding of sunken valuables was recognized from earliest times, but the possibility of defining meaningful groups of wrecked material or ...
Assos

Assos  

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An impregnable site in the southern Troad (Troas), facing south towards Lesbos (it was originally colonized from Methymna) and controlling the coast road. The harbour is artificial. The public ...
Caesarea

Caesarea  

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Archaeology
An ancient port on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, founded in 22 bc by Herod the Great on the site of a Phoenician harbour and named in honour of the Roman emperor Augustus Caesar. Caesarea became ...
Corfu

Corfu  

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Northernmost of the western Greek islands, located in the Ionian Sea just off the western coast of Epirus. Verdant and remote, Corcyra was identified with Homer's Scheria. During the 8th cent. ...
Cos

Cos  

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A fertile island in the SE Aegean, on the north–south trading route along the coast of Anatolia and onwards to Cyprus, Syria, and Egypt. The island was colonized, in the Dark Age, by Dorians. It was ...
economy, Hellenistic

economy, Hellenistic  

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The regions brought under the control of the Hellenistic kingdoms showed little economic unity or uniformity. Land-use systems ranged from irrigation regimes in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and parts of Iran ...
Eresus

Eresus  

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A small coastal polis in SW Lesbos; birthplace of Theophrastus and probably Sappho. The earliest finds are Archaic. Its small harbour had an artificial mole. In 428 bc the defences ...
harbor

harbor   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

Brit. harbour n. a place on the coast where vessels may find shelter, especially one protected from rough water by piers, jetties, and other artificial structures....

harborage

harborage n.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

a harbor or other place of shelter.

harbours

harbours   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
416 words

The late antique collapse of the imperial annona diminished the utility of larger Roman harbours; maintenance and dredging grew

harbours

harbours   Reference library

Philip de Souza

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
417 words

The earliest man-made harbour facilities in the Mediterranean region were the riverside quays of Mesopotamia and Egypt, for which records go back to at least the second millennium ...

Herod the Great

Herod the Great  

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(c.73–4bc), son of the Idumaean Antipater, was through him made governor of Galilee in 47 bc and then, with his brother, designated tetrarch by Mark Antony. Herod escaped the Parthian invasion of 40, ...
Lesbos

Lesbos  

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The third largest Aegean island after Crete and Euboea, 10 km. (6 mi.) from NW Anatolia. Lesbos was usually divided between five competing poleis: Mytilene (the most powerful), Methymna, Pyrrha, ...
periploi

periploi  

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Subject:
History
‘voyages around’ (i.e. coasting) were the standard basis of ancient descriptive geography. Sequences of harbours, landings, watering‐places, shelters from bad weather, landmarks, or hazards could be ...
Portunus

Portunus  

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God worshipped in the Tiber harbour at Rome (festival, the Portunalia, 17 August; a flamen is attested). Originally linked with ‘ways in’ in the wider sense, his cult came to ...
Portus

Portus  

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Claudius undertook the construction, which Caesar had planned, of an enclosed harbour two miles north of Ostia, linked to the Tiber by a canal: to remedy the very difficult conditions of ...
Ravenna

Ravenna  

A city near the Adriatic coast in NE central Italy, which became the capital of the Western Roman Empire in 402 and then of the Ostrogothic kingdom of Italy, afterwards serving as capital of ...
Rhine

Rhine  

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The Rhine. The Rhine became the Roman frontier in Caesar's time and, despite Augustus' attempt (12 bc–ad 9) to move beyond it and a somewhat longer (Flavians to c.ad 260) projection of the Upper ...

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