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Goibniu

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ale

ale  

The standard word for an ‘alcoholic drink made by fermenting malt’ in Anglo-Saxon England was ealu, source of modern English ale (bėor, modern English beer, existed, but was not in common use). Then ...
Altrom Tige Dá Medar

Altrom Tige Dá Medar  

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[Ir., The Nurture of the Houses of the Two Milk Vessels].A late Middle Irish narrative of the Mythological Cycle included in the 15th-century Book of Fermoy. Scholarly attention in the story has ...
Balor

Balor  

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The chief of the Fomorians of Gaelic mythology. One of his eyes had the power of destroying whatever it looked on. The eye was put out and Balor himself slain ...
blacksmith

blacksmith  

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See GOIBNIU, smith of the Tuatha Dé Danann; Gofannon, the smith of early Welsh narrative. See also SMITH.
Bres

Bres  

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[Ir., shapely, beautiful (?); fight, uproar, din (?)].Name borne by several mythological and legendary figures (sometimes by more than one in the same narrative). the best known of which is Bres the ...
Bríg,

Bríg,  

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[Ir., high, noble, power (?)].A daughter of the Dagda whose son Rúadán is killed by Goibniu. In her grief she gives the first mourning chant or keen [Ir. caoineadh] in Ireland.
Brigit

Brigit  

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[Ir., the exalted one].Pre-Christian Irish goddess of fire, smithing, fertility, cattle, crops, and poetry. She was the daughter of the Dagda and according to later tradition, the wife of Senchán ...
craftsman

craftsman  

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In the Celtic countries the concept of craftsman [Ir. ceardaí, saor; W crefftwr] would include artisan, carpenter, potter, or wright, but does not always include smith [Ir. gabha; W gof]. The ...
Credne

Credne  

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[Ir., craftsman, artisan].A divine artificer of the Tuatha Dé Danann, usually working in bronze but also in brass and gold. Together with Goibniu, the smith, and Luchta, the wright or carpenter, he ...
Gaiblín

Gaiblín  

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Possible owner of Glas Ghaibhleann, the magical cow; lived in Co. Cavan. He may be a folk derivative of Goibniu, the ancient craft-god.
Glas Ghaibhleann

Glas Ghaibhleann  

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[Ir. glas, green, greenish blue; of Gaiblín (?), of Goibniu (?)].Celebrated, magical cow, white with green spots, whose inexhaustible supply of milk signalled prosperity. The original owner is a ...
Glwyddyn Saer

Glwyddyn Saer  

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Shadowy Welsh figure, probably counterpart of the Irish craft-god Goibniu. See also GOFANNON; GOBBÁN SAOR.
Gobán Saor

Gobán Saor  

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A mythical craftsman in Irish medieval literature and folklore.
Gofannon

Gofannon  

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[W gof, gofan, smith].Welsh divine smith, one of the children of Dôn and a British counterpart to the Irish Goibniu; he is best remembered as the uncle who kills his nephew Dylan. Culhwch's third ...
Goibniu

Goibniu   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Subject Reference
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2004

[OIr. gobae, smith].

Smith of the Tuatha Dé Danann and one of the three gods of craft, na trídé

Irish mythology

Irish mythology  

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In the popular imagination Ireland is often represented as a land of legends and myths, where fairies and leprechauns and old gods still make their presence felt, and where storytellers ...
Luchta

Luchta  

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Carpenter or wright [Ir. sóer], god of the Tuatha Dé Danann, one of the three gods of craft [trí dée dána] of early Ireland, along with Credne and Goibniu. Luchta was thought adept at making shields ...
Lug Lámfhota

Lug Lámfhota  

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[OIr. lug, light, brightness; lámhfhada, long-armed, long-handed].May also bear the patronymics mac Céin, mac Ethlenn, Maicnia, and the epithets Samildánach and lldánach. Celebrated chief of the ...
Mullaghmast

Mullaghmast  

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[Ir. mullach, a hilltop; maisten, of Maiste].Hill (563 feet) 1 mile W of Ballitore, Co. Kildare, rich in mythological and archaeological associations. In nearby Glenn Treithim [OIr. Treichim], the ...
Néit

Néit  

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Shadowy early Irish god of war, often grouped with the Fomorians. He is usually portrayed as having two wives or consorts, Badb and Nemain. This does not make him an adulterer; rather, he may be ...

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