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antiscience

antiscience  

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Is a phantom phenomenon.There are no self-described anti-scientists or degrees in antiscience. Even the most anti-modernist movements oppose science in the name of a better science. Yet the specter ...
Arthur Kornberg

Arthur Kornberg  

(1918–2007)US biochemist who discovered how deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is replicated in the cell and reproduced the reaction in the test tube. He was awarded the 1959 Nobel Prize for Physiology or ...
bacteriology

bacteriology  

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n. the science concerned with the study of bacteria. It is a branch of microbiology. —bacteriological adj. —bacteriologist n.
bacteriophage

bacteriophage  

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(phage) n. a virus that attacks bacteria. In general, a phage consists of a head, tail, and tail fibres, all composed of protein molecules, and a core of DNA. The tail and tail fibres are responsible ...
biogenetic law

biogenetic law  

The early stages of development in animal species resemble one another, the species diverging more and more as development proceeds. The law was formulated by the embryologist E. K. von Baer ...
biology

biology  

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The study of living organisms; or a generic term for the life sciences, including botany, zoology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, and related disciplines. [From Greek bios life + logos word, ...
breeding

breeding  

The process of sexual reproduction and bearing offspring. Selective breeding of both plants and animals is used in agriculture to produce offspring that possess the beneficial characters of both ...
centrifuge

centrifuge  

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n. a device for separating components of different densities in a liquid, using centrifugal force. The liquid is placed in special containers that are spun at high speed around a central axis.
Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin  

(1809–82)British naturalist, who studied medicine in Edinburgh followed by theology at Cambridge University, intending a career in the Church. However, his interest in natural history led him to ...
clone

clone  

1. a group of genetically identical cells or organisms all descended from a single common ancestral cell or organism by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. 2. genetically ...
Conrad Hal Waddington

Conrad Hal Waddington  

(1905–1975)British geneticist who proposed the theory of genetic assimilation to account for cases in which apparently acquired characteristics are brought under some degree of genetic control. He ...
cytogenetics

cytogenetics  

n. a science that links the study of inheritance (genetics) with that of cells (cytology); it is concerned mainly with the study of the chromosomes, especially their origin, structure, and functions.
cytology

cytology  

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n. the study of the structure and function of cells. The examination of cells under a microscope is used in the diagnosis of various diseases. These cells are obtained by scraping an organ, as in ...
double helix

double helix  

The Watson-Crick model of DNA structure, involving plectonemic coiling (q.v.) of two hydrogen-bonded polynucleotide, antiparallel (q.v.) strands wound into a right-handed spiral configuration. See ...
ecological genetics

ecological genetics  

The study of genetics with particular reference to variation on a global and local geographic scale.http://www.helsinki.fi/biosci/egru/ Website of the Ecological Genetics Research Unit at the ...
emergentism, British

emergentism, British  

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The British emergentist tradition began with John Stuart Mill's discussion of the composition of causes in A System of Logic (1843), and includes among its major works Alexander Bain's Logic ...
ethics and science

ethics and science  

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Even if it is possible to distinguish, it is no longer possible to dissociate science from its practical applications, which often raise ethical questions. The interaction of ethics and science ...
eugenics

eugenics  

The study of methods of improving the quality of human populations by the application of genetic principles. Positive eugenics would seek to do this by selective breeding programmes. Negative ...
evolution

evolution  

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In biology, the genetic transformations of populations through time, resulting from genetic variation and the subsequent impact of the environment on rates of reproductive success. See also Darwinism.
Francis Galton

Francis Galton  

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(1822–1911)British explorer and anthropologist, a cousin of Charles Darwin. His primary interest was eugenics. He made contributions to statistics in the areas of regression and correlation.

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