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Clodius Pulcher, Publius

Clodius Pulcher, Publius  

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Youngest of six children of Claudius Pulcher, b. c.92 bc. In 68 he incited the troops of his brother‐in‐law Licinius Lucullus to mutiny in Armenia. On his return to Rome he had been apparently ...
Cremera

Cremera  

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Stream flowing past Veii to join the Tiber at Fidenae. Three hundred members of the Fabian clan perished on its banks (477 bc), after establishing a blockhouse from which to raid Veientine territory. ...
forum Caesaris

forum Caesaris  

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Or dedicated by Caesar in 46 bc, on land bought eight years earlier for 60 million sesterces, and completed by Octavian (Augustus). The forum had long colonnades on the east and west sides and a ...
inheritance

inheritance  

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Unlike all other law codes from the ancient Middle East, widows in Israel could not inherit property from deceased husbands, and daughters only inherited if there were no sons. Hence Naomi's cry of ...
Iūlius Caesar, Germānicus

Iūlius Caesar, Germānicus  

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Elder son of Nero Claudius Drusus and Antonia (2) the Younger, was born in 15 or 16 bc and adopted in ad 4 by his uncle Tiberius. As Tiberius was immediately adopted by Augustus, Germanicus became a ...
Janus

Janus  

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God of door and gate (iānua) (the term also for the type of honorific gateway that we misleadingly call ‘triumphal arch’). Like a door, he looked both ways, and is therefore depicted as a ...
laudātiō fūnebris

laudātiō fūnebris  

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The funeral speech praising the accomplishments and virtues of the deceased. Because of the public nature of funerals, the speech offered an opportunity to display the family's status, to connect the ...
names

names  

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Recorded from Old English and of Germanic origin, the word comes ultimately from a root shared by Latin nomen and Greek onoma.have one's name and number on it (of a bullet) be destined to kill one; ...
Ovid

Ovid  

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(43 bc–c. 17ad),Roman poet. He is particularly known for his elegiac love poems (such as the Amores and the Ars Amatoria) and for the Metamorphoses, a hexametric epic which retells Greek and Roman ...
patrician

patrician  

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Formed a privileged class of Roman citizens. The word is probably connected with patrēs (‘Fathers’), a formal collective term for patrician senators (see senate). In the republican period patrician ...
plebs

plebs  

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The name given to the mass of Roman citizens, as distinct from the privileged patricians. Our sources maintain that in the early republic the plebeians were excluded from religious colleges, ...
pontifex

pontifex  

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The Pope. The name comes (in the late 17th century) via French from Latin pontifex ‘high priest’.
princeps senatus

princeps senatus  

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The senator whose name was entered first on the senate list compiled by the censors. Once selected, he held his position for life (subject to confirmation by each new pair of censors), and longevity ...
prosopography

prosopography  

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Is the study of individuals, and is derived from Gk. prosōpon, one meaning of which is ‘person’. Prosopography, as practised in ancient history, is a method which uses onomastic evidence (see names, ...
sodales

sodales  

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Are either ‘companions, mates’, or else ‘members of a single college or fraternity’. Examples of the latter sense are the secondary religious groups of Rome: these include the fētiālēs, who made ...
Tarquinius Collatinus, Lucius

Tarquinius Collatinus, Lucius  

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Great-nephew of Tarquinius Priscus, husband of Lucretia, and one of the founders of the Roman republic. After his wife's suicide he and L. Iunius Brutus conspired to overthrow Tarquinius Superbus ...
Valerius Antias

Valerius Antias  

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Roman historian of the 1st cent. bc. His work, known only through quotations and allusions in later authors, covered the history of Rome from the origins down to 91 bc at least. The reign of ...
Ve(d)iovis

Ve(d)iovis  

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Roman god, a form of Jupiter, with a festival on 21 May, and temples on the Tiber island and between the two summits of the Capitoline hill (see Capitol). Important ...
Virgil

Virgil  

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(70–19bc),Roman poet. He wrote three major works: the Eclogues, ten pastoral poems, blending traditional themes of Greek bucolic poetry with contemporary political and literary themes; the Georgics, ...

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