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William Lloyd Garrison

(1805—1879)

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Abby Kelley Foster

Abby Kelley Foster  

(b. 15 January 1810; d. 14 January 1887), reformer, abolitionist, lecturer, and women's rights activist.Abby Kelley was born in Pelham, Massachusetts, to parents of Irish-Quaker descent. She ...
abolitionism

abolitionism  

A term associated with protest on grounds of inhumanity and a call for the abolition of slavery (see, for example, the arguments of William Wilberforce, 1759–1833). More recently extended to the ...
abolitionist

abolitionist  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In the 19th century, supporters of the abolition of the slave-trade; the term is recorded from the early 19th century.
American Abolition Society

American Abolition Society  

The American Abolition Society (AAS) was organized in 1855. It stemmed from the New York City Abolition Society, which had been founded in the 1830s by William Goodell to build ...
American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society

American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society  

The American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS) resulted from a schism in the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS). The conflict pitted those loyal to the radical Boston abolitionist William ...
American Anti-Slavery Society

American Anti-Slavery Society  

The American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS) was founded in 1833 by a small group of radicals calling for the immediate abolition of slavery. The leading spirit was William Lloyd Garrison, whose ...
American Missionary Association

American Missionary Association  

The American Missionary Association formed in 1846 in Albany, New York, as an alliance of Christian abolitionists who chose not to associate with the existing missionary agencies operated by various ...
Amy Kirby Post

Amy Kirby Post  

(b. 20 December 1802; d. 29 January 1889) and (b. 26 February 1798; d. 9 May 1872), abolitionists.Amy and Isaac Post were key organizers of the abolitionist movement in ...
Angelina Grimké

Angelina Grimké  

(b. 20 February 1805; d. 26 October 1879), an abolitionist and women's rights activist.Angelina Emily Grimké was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the youngest daughter of John and Mary ...
Anna Elizabeth Dickinson

Anna Elizabeth Dickinson  

(b. 28 October 1842; d. 22 October 1932), abolitionist and feminist.Born in Philadelphia, Anna Elizabeth Dickinson was the youngest of five children of the devoted Quakers John and Mary ...
Antisabbatarianism

Antisabbatarianism  

During the early decades of the nineteenth century many American Christians advocated the virtues of Sabbath observance. These Sabbatarians opposed the desecration of the first day—that is, ...
antislavery

antislavery  

Slavery was regarded in later 18th‐cent. Britain as essential to the exploitation of the West Indian colonies and there was strong opposition to any interference with the institution, particularly ...
Antislavery Movement

Antislavery Movement  

Frederick Douglass was perhaps the perfect embodiment of the American antislavery movement. As a young slave on a large Maryland plantation, he rebelled both physically and psychologically against ...
Antislavery Press

Antislavery Press  

On 1 January 1831, in Boston, Massachusetts, William Lloyd Garrison launched his weekly antislavery newspaper, the Liberator, and a new phase in the history of the antislavery press was under ...
Austin Woolfolk

Austin Woolfolk  

(b. 1796; d. 1847), slave trader.Austin Woolfolk was the most infamous member of his family of slave traders in the minds of the abolitionists of his time, with six ...
Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In

Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In  

Although it was by and large a slave city, Baltimore boasted a large free black population, which included Frederick Douglass's wife, Anna Murray, who worked for a postman on the ...
Benjamin Lundy

Benjamin Lundy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(b. 4 January 1789; d. 22 August 1839), journalist and abolitionist.Benjamin Lundy's newspaper, The Genius of Universal Emancipation, founded in 1821, was the first antislavery journal in the United ...
Black Church

Black Church  

Apart from the ancient Churches of Nubia and Ethiopia, Black Churches originated in the 18th cent. among the descendants of African slaves in the United States of America. From the 1740s, evangelical ...
Cambria Incident

Cambria Incident  

In August 1845, shortly after the publication of his first autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, the author boarded the steamship Cambria of the Cunard Line for Great ...
Cassius M. Clay

Cassius M. Clay  

(b. 19 October 1810; d. 22 July 1903), abolitionist and politician.“I do not set up for being perfect: far from it!” wrote the Kentucky antislavery agitator Cassius Marcellus Clay ...

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