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Actium

Actium  

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A flat sandy promontory at the entrance to the Ambracian Gulf, forming part of the territory of Anactorium, as well as the NW extremity of Acarnania. A cult of Apollo was located here as early as the ...
Amphitheaters and Arenas

Amphitheaters and Arenas  

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In both form and function, the amphitheater is a unique structure. It evolved especially to house Rome's blood spectacles and was built around an elliptically shaped arena (often written as ...
animal

animal  

Animal Farm a fable (1945) by George Orwell which consists of a satire on Russian Communism as it developed under Stalin. The animals of the farm, led by the pigs, revolt against the cruel farmer, ...
archive

archive  

A historical document. The plural form is also applied to the place where such documents are housed, e.g. a county record office.
athletics

athletics  

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GreekAt the core of Greek athletics was an individual's struggle to gain victory over an opponent; hence it included not only (as ‘athletics’ implies nowadays) track and field events but also boxing, ...
auctour and auctoritee

auctour and auctoritee  

(L. auctor and auctoritas). The ME words can mean respectively ‘creator, originator’ as well as ‘author’, and ‘authority’ in its legal, political, and ecclesiastical senses. However, when used of ...
Bacchus

Bacchus  

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In Greek mythology, another name for Dionysus.
carnival

carnival  

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A period of public revelry at a regular time each year, as during the week before Lent in Roman Catholic countries, involving processions, music, dancing, and the use of masquerade. Recorded from the ...
chariot racing

chariot racing  

A form of horse racing immensely popular in the ancient civilizations of Greece, Rome, and Byzantium, with some predecessors in the privileged cultures of earlier civilizations, such as in Syria, ...
chivalry

chivalry  

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Subject:
History
The medieval knightly system with its religious, moral, and social code; knights, noblemen, and horsemen of that system collectively. Recorded from Middle English, the word comes, via Old French ...
Clerk's Tale

Clerk's Tale  

Is the first tale in Fragment IV of the Canterbury Tales, and is followed immediately by the Merchant's Tale. In the Prologue (in couplets) the Clerk is asked to tell ...
comedy

comedy  

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Literature
Professional entertainment consisting of jokes and satirical sketches, intended to make an audience laugh. Recorded from late Middle English (as a genre of drama, also denoting a narrative poem with ...
Cyrene

Cyrene  

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An ancient Greek city in North Africa, near the coast in Cyrenaica, which from the 4th century bc was a great intellectual centre, with a noted medical school.See also Simon of Cyrene.
dialogue

dialogue  

Is extensively used by Chaucer to give a sense of vivid actuality. It can range from formal debate to familiar conversation, covering all kinds of emotional situations and encounters. He ...
drunkenness

drunkenness  

Intoxication resulting from imbibing an excess of alcohol. It is an offence contrary to s 12 of the Licensing Act 1872 to be drunk in a public place.
fabliau

fabliau  

A short tale in verse, almost invariably in octosyllabic couplets, dealing for the most part from a comic point of view with incidents of ordinary life. The fabliau was an important element in French ...
Friar's Tale

Friar's Tale  

Follows The Wife of Bath's Tale in Fragment III. It is introduced by a short prologue in which the Friar announces that he will tell ‘a game’ about a Summoner. ...
General Prologue

General Prologue  

The 858 lines in couplets which introduce The Canterbury Tales in Fragment I. It is spring: the natural world revives, and ‘folk’ begin to want to go on pilgrimage, and ...
gladiator

gladiator  

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In ancient Rome, a man trained to fight with weapons against other men or wild animals in an arena; usually a slave or prisoner trained for the purpose. The word is Latin, and comes from gladius ...
Greek religion

Greek religion  

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The religion of the ancient Greek world. It was polytheistic, involving the worship of several gods and goddesses. The most important deities were the sky-god Zeus (ruler of Olympus), his wife Hera ...

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