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actuairole

actuairole  

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History
(French), a small galley propelled by oars and used as a transport for troops up and down the French coast in the 18th and early 19th centuries.
amphibious Operations

amphibious Operations  

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An attack launched from the sea by naval and landing forces, embarked in ships or craft involving a landing on a hostile or potentially hostile shore. An amphibious operation involves five phases: ...
Argo

Argo  

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History
In Greek mythology, the ship in which Jason and his companions, the Argonauts, sailed in the quest for the Golden Fleece (see golden). Their story is one of the oldest Greek sagas, known to Homer, ...
Barbary pirates

Barbary pirates  

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Generations of mainly Muslim corsairs who operated from the coast of northern Africa and were notorious for their ferocity and the skill. The name Barbary comes from the Berber tribes who occupied ...
Battle of Lepanto

Battle of Lepanto  

A naval battle fought in 1571 close to the port of Lepanto at the entrance to the Gulf of Corinth. The Christian forces of Rome, Venice, and Spain, under the leadership of Don John of Austria, ...
beak

beak  

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The name sometimes given to the metal point or ram fixed on the bows of war galleys and used to pierce the hulls of enemy galleys, and thus sink or disable them.
bergantina

bergantina  

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A small Mediterranean rowing and sailing vessel of the 14th–16th centuries, which could be considered as the Mediterranean counterpart of the English pinnace of the same period. Bergantinas were ...
bireme

bireme  

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A galley having two banks of oars. It was invariably fitted with a metal ram and was used, particularly in battles at sea, in the Mediterranean until the mid-17th century.See also warfare at sea.See ...
brigantine

brigantine  

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A two-masted vessel square rigged on the foremast and fore-and-aft rigged on the mainmast. The name is thought to come from the sea brigands, particularly those operating in the Mediterranean, ...
Bucentaur

Bucentaur  

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The state barge used by the Doge of Venice for the Marriage of Chancery on Ascension Day.The name comes ultimately from Italian bucentoro, and may be taken from the figurehead of the vessel, ...
burgoo

burgoo  

A culinary term of unknown origin and wide application. Originally, in the eighteenth century, it denoted a sort of thick oatmeal gruel eaten by sailors. Subsequently, in the southern states of the ...
cabin

cabin  

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(possibly from the Latin capanna, little house), a room or space in a ship partitioned off by bulkheads to provide a private apartment for officers, passengers, and crew members for sleeping and/or ...
caboose

caboose  

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From the Dutch, a defunct term used to describe the galley, or cookhouse, of a small vessel. It was normally built on deck, and in shape resembled a sentry box. It was originally a wooden box or ...
Canal Cristoforo da

Canal Cristoforo da  

(1510–62),Venetian naval commander, born on 12 September 1510 into a poor branch of a patrician family. He entered the navy of the republic and served as a commander in ...
carous

carous  

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A sort of gallery or bridge, pivoted in the centre and fitted in ancient warships, such as galleys, as a means of boarding an enemy. On forcing a way alongside an enemy it was hoisted up by a tackle ...
charley noble

charley noble  

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Originally the name of the chimney fitted when the galley fires were lit to take the smoke above decks. The name was later extended to cover all portable chimneys fitted to the deck, i.e. for coal ...
coach horses

coach horses  

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History
The name given in the old Royal Navy to the men who rowed the admiral's barge or captain's galley. The name also spread from the navy to embrace the crews of state barges when they rowed with their ...
corvette

corvette  

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A warship of the 17th–18th centuries with a flush deck and a single tier of guns. It was smaller than a frigate, and was ship rigged. The design was originally French and was a development of the ...
deckhouse

deckhouse  

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A square or oblong cabin erected on the deck of a ship. In the sailing warships of the Royal Navy it was known, in a perverse sort of way, as the round house because one could walk round it. ...
esnecca

esnecca  

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History
A long galley or longship, propelled by oar or sail, used by Scandinavian seamen as a warship probably between the 5th and 11th centuries. It is generally described as having twenty rowing benches, ...

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