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Acheloüs

Acheloüs  

The longest Greek river, rising in central Epirus and debouching into the NW corner of the Corinthian Gulf. Its lower reaches were affected by heavy alluviation and constituted the much disputed ...
Antaeus

Antaeus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
In Greek mythology, a giant, the son of Poseidon and Earth, who compelled all comers to wrestle with him; he gained renewed strength with the ground, and overcame and killed all opponents until he ...
Apples of the Hesperides

Apples of the Hesperides  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
For the eleventh of his Twelve Labors, Herakles was sent to fetch the golden apples of the Hesperides, which had been a wedding gift to Hera from the Greek earth ...
Artemis

Artemis  

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In Greek mythology, a goddess, daughter of Zeus and sister of Apollo. She was a huntress and is typically depicted with a bow and arrows, and was also identified with Selene, goddess of the moon; her ...
chaos

chaos  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
‘First of all Chaos came into being’, says Hesiod; it did not exist from everlasting. What it was like he does not say; the name means ‘gaping void’.
chthonian

chthonian  

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[Di]Literally meaning ‘belonging to the earth’, a term used to describe a god or goddess of the earth or the underworld. Also extended to mean the divine creative force, and the source of fertility ...
Cronus

Cronus  

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In Greek mythology, the supreme god until dethroned by Zeus. The youngest son of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaia (Earth), Cronus overthrew and castrated his father and then married his sister Rhea. Because ...
curses

curses  

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A curse expresses a wish that evil may befall a person or persons. Several different types can be distinguished, according to setting, motive, and condition. The most direct curses are maledictions ...
Cyclopes

Cyclopes  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Are one‐eyed giants. In Homer they are savage and pastoral, and live in a distant country without government or laws. Odysseus visits them in his wanderings and enters the cave of one of them, ...
Delphic oracle

Delphic oracle  

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Oracle of Apollo. Its origins are dated to the very end of the 9th cent. bc, and eventually it developed into the most important Greek oracle. It was consulted by poleis (see polis) as well as ...
Demeter

Demeter  

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In Greek mythology, the corn goddess, daughter of Cronus and Rhea, and mother of Persephone. She is associated with Cybele, and her symbol is an ear of corn. The Eleusinian mysteries were held in ...
Deucalion and Pyrrha

Deucalion and Pyrrha  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Deucalion and his wife Pyrrha are the central figures in a Greek flood myth. Deucalion was the son of Prometheus. He and his wife were so good that Zeus spared ...
earth

earth  

Earth mother (in mythology and primitive religion) a goddess symbolizing fertility and the source of life; in extended usage, an archetypally nurturing and maternal woman.earth-shattering (in ...
Echidne

Echidne  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The daughter of Gaia and Tartaros, Echidne (Echnida), was the monstrous half woman, half serpent mother, by the fire- breathing giant Typhon, of several monsters in Greek mythology. Her brood ...
Erechtheus

Erechtheus  

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A cult figure worshipped on the Athenian Acropolis, formally identified with Poseidon but often regarded as an early king of Athens. The Iliadic Catalogue knows an Erechtheus who was born from Earth ...
Ericthonius

Ericthonius  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The Greek smith god Hephaistos assaulted the goddess Athene and in the ensuing struggle he ejaculated onto her thigh. The disgusted goddess flung the semen onto the earth—that is, onto ...
European mythology

European mythology  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Like most humans, the earliest mythmaking inhabitants of the European continent very likely thought of creation in terms of a feminine metaphor. The primary creative miracle in the purely animal ...
Five ages

Five ages  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Greek mythology tells of five ages in the development or deterioration of the human race. First came the Golden Age, when humans grew out of Gaia (Earth). This was a ...
Furies

Furies  

In Greek mythology, spirits of punishment, often represented as one of three goddesses (Alecto, Megaera, and Tisiphone) with hair composed of snakes, who executed the curses pronounced upon ...
Gaia

Gaia   Reference library

The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences
Length:
1,262 words

Gaia (“Earth”) is the name of a Greek goddess also called Ge, from whose name words like “geology” and “geography”

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