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abrasive

abrasive  

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Overview Page
Hard and rough substances used to grind and polish surfaces. Some abrasives are used as fine powders, others in larger fragments with cutting edges. Most natural abrasives are minerals, such as ...
Arthur Randall Wells

Arthur Randall Wells  

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(1877–1942).English Arts-and-Crafts architect. As Clerk of Works for Lethaby's Church of All Saints, Brockhampton, Herefordshire (1902), he absorbed much of the elder man's style, as is clear from ...
building stones

building stones  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
It is probably true to say that all the rocks that are accessible to humans have been used for constructional purposes at one time or another. In general, the stones ...
calion

calion  

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Overview Page
1 Flint nodule, boulder, or pebble.2 Flint panel in flush-work.
chalcedony

chalcedony  

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Overview Page
A mineral consisting of a microcrystalline variety of quartz. It occurs in several forms, including a large number of semiprecious gemstones; for example, sard, carnelian, jasper, onyx, chrysoprase, ...
chert

chert  

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1 Chalcedonic (see chalcedony) variety of cryptocrystalline silica, SiO2, that occurs as nodules or irregular masses in a sedimentary environment, often in association with black shales and ...
course

course  

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Any horizontal level range of bricks, stones, etc., placed according to some rule or order in the construction of a wall, laid evenly. Coursed rubble, for example, is roughly dressed stones of the ...
Edward Schroder Prior

Edward Schroder Prior  

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 (1852–1932) English architect.His diverse practice included schools (music schools at Harrow, 1890–91, Winchester 1901–4), university buildings (the Medical School, Cambridge 1899–1902), and ...
flint

flint   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
127 words
Flint was used in the Stone Age for tools and weapons. The most spectacular site is Grime's Graves (Norfolk), which was mined by deep shafts in prehistoric times. Flint has been used as a ... More
flint

flint   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
84 words

Granular variety of quartz (SiO2) of a fine crystalline structure. It is usually brown or dark grey, although

flint

flint   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
55 words
[Ma] A hard brittle siliceous rock with conchoidal fracturing properties that is highly suitable for the manufacture of edged tools by flaking or knapping. Found as nodules or ... More
flushwork

flushwork  

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Overview Page
Knapped flint, with the split (spaultered) dark sides of the flint facing outwards, built into finely jointed panels framed by freestone dressings resembling tracery, all the finished faces of flint ...
pier

pier  

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1 A detached mass of construction, generally acting as a support, such as the solid part of a wall between two openings, or a massive element from which arches spring, as in a bridge.2 Support, such ...
proudwork

proudwork  

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Masonry, found occasionally in Tudor Gothic work, similar to flushwork, except that the freestone patterns and tracery stand in higher relief than the flint panels. From proud, meaning projecting ...
quartz

quartz  

The most abundant and common mineral, consisting of crystalline silica (silicon dioxide, SiO2), crystallizing in the trigonal system. It has a hardness of 7 on the Mohs' scale. Well-formed crystals ...
rock rash

rock rash  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Stone facing composed of a mosaic of irregularly shaped and sized stones, frequently with cobbles, flints, and geodes.
round tower

round tower  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[MC]Tall narrow circular stone towers with conical roofs built within Irish monasteries, probably as places of refuge, from the 9th century ad onwards. A small number of examples were built in ...
sarsen

sarsen  

[Ma]Hard crystalline sandstone found as boulders scattered across the chalk downland of central southern England, seemingly the remnants of now‐eroded geological strata that once covered the chalk. ...
shingle

shingle  

Pebbles on a beach, rounded by abrasion, and reduced in size by attrition. The abrasion rate of shingle is linked to, in rank order: mean wave height, pebble type, and pebble weight (Dornbusch et al. ...
silica

silica  

A mineral composed of silicon dioxide that is found in all volcanic rocks and is an important ingredient in the Earth's crust.

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