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figure of speech

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addition

addition  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
1. One of the four logical ways in which perception, memory, or representation can transform an experience that is ostensibly merely reproduced. Addition involves adding one or more elements which ...
adynaton

adynaton  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A figure of speech related to hyperbole that emphasizes the inexpressibility of some thing, idea, or feeling, either by stating that words cannot describe it, or by comparing it with something (e.g. ...
allegory

allegory  

A story, poem, or picture which can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one. The word comes (in late Middle English) via Old French and Latin from Greek ...
alliteration

alliteration  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
The rhetorical device of commencing adjacent or closely connected words with the same sound or syllable. The term comes from Latin ad- (expressing addition) + littera ‘letter’.
amplification

amplification  

Enlargement: expressing an idea more expansively, or increasing the amplitude of a sound. In analytical psychology, interpretation (2) of a dream-image through directed association and exploration of ...
anadiplosis

anadiplosis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[an‐ă‐di‐ploh‐sis](plural‐oses)A rhetorical figure of repetition in which a word or phrase appears both at the end of one clause, sentence, or stanza, and at the beginning of the next, thus linking ...
anaphora

anaphora  

Anaphora in general is used of coreferential relations, where one element in a sentence takes its meaning or reference from another. In ‘John said that it would rain, but I don't believe it’ the last ...
Anastrophē

Anastrophē  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
(Lat. inversio; Engl. reversal)is a deviation from grammatical word order in that the sequence of any two words is reversed, an ordo praeposterus (Bede, pp. 672–735). The reversal of ...
antanaclasis

antanaclasis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A figure of speech that makes a pun or paronomasia by repeating the same word, or two words sounding alike (see homophone), but with differing senses.
antimetabole

antimetabole  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[anti‐me‐tab‐oli]A figure of speech in which a pair of words is repeated in reverse order: ‘Pleasure's a sin, and sometimes sin's a pleasure’ (Byron). This figure is a subtype of chiasmus.
antiphrasis

antiphrasis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[an‐tif‐ră‐sis]A figure of speech in which a single word is used in a sense directly opposite to its usual meaning, as in the naming of a giant as ‘Tiny’ or of an enemy as ‘friend’; the briefest form ...
Antisthecōn

Antisthecōn  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
(Gk., also antistoecon, “standing opposite in pairs”; Lat. littera pro littera “letter for letter”),a metaplasm by substitution of a letter or sound within a word. It may be a ...
antistrophe

antistrophe  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(‘turning about’),in a Greek chorus, the response to the strophe, recited as the chorus proceeded in the opposite direction to that followed in the strophe. See Ode.
antithesis

antithesis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A figure of speech in which sharply contrasted ideas are juxtaposed in a balanced or parallel phrase or grammatical structure, as in ‘Hee for God only, shee for God in him’ (Milton).
antonomasia

antonomasia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[an‐ton‐ŏ‐may‐ziă]A figure of speech that replaces a proper name with an epithet (the Bard for Shakespeare), official address (His Holiness for a pope), or other indirect description; or one that ...
Aphaeresis

Aphaeresis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
(Lat. detractio initii)is a subtractive metaphoneme that omits sounds at the beginning of a word. It is often used for meeting metrical or rhythmical requirements. “You shall find / ...
Apocopē

Apocopē  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
(Lat. detractio finis)is a subtractive metaphoneme that omits sounds at the end of a word. This may be for reasons of meter, rhythm, or rhyme. “First kill th' enormous ...
aporia

aporia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A serious perplexity or insoluble problem. The Socratic method of raising problems without providing solutions is sometimes called the aporetic method. Deconstruction is often credited with ...
Aporia

Aporia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
(Lat. addubitatio),which Puttenham (The Arte of English Poesie, 1589) calls “The Doubtful,” is a pragmatic figure of speech that states the author's pretended inability to speak competently about a ...
aposiopesis

aposiopesis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A rhetorical artifice, in which the speaker comes to a sudden halt in the middle of a sentence, as if unable or unwilling to proceed.

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