Overview

felony

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attainder

attainder  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The extinction of civil rights and powers when judgement of death or outlawry was recorded against a person convicted of treason or felony. It was the severest English common law penalty, for an ...
escheat

escheat  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Escheated property reverted to a lord when a tenant was guilty of a felony or when he died without adult heirs. The term will often be found in manorial records.
felony

felony   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
35 words

Crimes such as murder, rape, arson, robbery, burglary, etc. were regarded (except in Scottish courts) as being more serious than

felony

felony   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
35 words

Crimes such as murder, rape, arson, robbery, burglary, etc. were regarded (except in Scottish courts) as being more serious than ...

hue and cry

hue and cry  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The practice in medieval England whereby a person could call out loudly for help in pursuing a suspected criminal. All who heard the call were obliged by law to join in the chase; failure to do so ...
larceny

larceny  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.Formerly (before 1969), theft. Larceny was more limited than theft and required an asportation (carrying away of the property).
misdemeanour

misdemeanour  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.Formerly (i.e. before 1967), any of the less serious offences, as opposed to felony.
misprision

misprision  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.Failure to report an offence. The former crime of misprision of felony has now been replaced by the crime of compounding an offence. However, the common-law offence of misprision of treason still ...

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