Update

Overview

Eusebius

(c. 260—339) bishop and Church historian

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-20 of 204 entries

  • Type: Overview Page x
clear all

View:

Abgar V

Abgar V  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
4 bce–50 ce,King of Edessa. According to a popular tradition as early as Eusebius (and also in the Doctrine of Addai) he wrote a letter to Jesus asking him to visit and heal him.[...]
Acacius of Caesarea

Acacius of Caesarea  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. 365), Arian theologian. He succeeded Eusebius in the see of Caesarea (in Palestine) in 341, but was pronounced deposed by the Council of Sardica (343). In 359 he proposed a Homoean Creed at the ...
Acts of the Apostles

Acts of the Apostles  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A New Testament book immediately following the Gospels and relating the history of the early Church, and in particular the missionary journeys of St Paul and others.
Acts of the Martyrs

Acts of the Martyrs  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The most reliable accounts of early Christian martyrdoms are those (few) which follow the official reports of the trials. The so-called ‘Passions’ were written by Christian authors and based on ...
Addai

Addai  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The traditional founder of the Church at Edessa. In Syriac tradition he was one of the 72 (or 70) disciples of Lk. 10: 1. According to the Doctrine of Addai he was sent by St Thomas the Apostle to ...
Africanus, Sextus Julius

Africanus, Sextus Julius  

Roman author; born Jerusalem ca.160, died ca.240. Circa 221 Africanus wrote his Chronographies in Greek, which is preserved now only in fragments; it was either a world history or tables ...
Alexandrian Era

Alexandrian Era  

A system of computation of world chronology produced by two Egyptian monks and chronographers of the early 5th C., Annianos and Panodoros; the system is known from and was used ...
Ammonius Saccas

Ammonius Saccas  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(fl.200–50)Alexandrian Platonist, and teacher of Plotinus and Origen (not to be confused with an earlier Ammonius, who taught Plutarch). Little is known of Ammonius, who seems to have belonged to the ...
Andrew

Andrew  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Brother of Simon Peter (Mark 1: 16), with whom he was fishing when invited by Jesus to become a disciple. But John 1: 35–41 offers an alternative account; Andrew followed Jesus after hearing John the ...
antilegomena

antilegomena  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The name given by Eusebius of Caesarea to those Scriptural books whose claim to be considered part of the NT Canon was disputed.
Apelles

Apelles  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(2nd cent.), founder of a Gnostic sect. Originally a disciple of Marcion, he modified his dualism in an attempt to defend a less Docetic doctrine of the Person of Christ. Christ, he held, came down ...
Apollonius of Tyana

Apollonius of Tyana  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(d. c.98), Neopythagorean philosopher. Anti-Christian writers composed biographies of him which consciously paralleled the Gospel life of Christ.
Arianism

Arianism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
In Christian theology, the main heresy denying the divinity of Christ, originating with the Alexandrian priest Arius (c. 250–c. 336). Arianism maintained that the son of God was created by the Father ...
Aristarchus

Aristarchus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Of Tegea, tragic poet, dated by Eusebius to 454/3 bc (date of first victory?) and called a contemporary of Euripides by the Suda, which says that he wrote 70 plays ...
Aristides

Aristides  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(2nd cent.) of Athens, Christian philosopher and Apologist. In an ‘Apology’ presented either to the Emp. Hadrian in 124 or to Antoninus Pius (d. 161), Aristides sought to defend the existence and ...
Aristion

Aristion  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(1st cent.). According to Papias (as reported by Eusebius), he was a primary authority, with John the Presbyter, for the traditions about the Lord.
Aristo of Pella

Aristo of Pella  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(c.140), Apologist. He apparently wrote a (lost) ‘Disputation’; in it Jason, a baptized Jew, converts Papiscus, a fellow Jew, by proving the fulfilment of the Messianic prophecies in Christ.
Aristobulus

Aristobulus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
An Alexandrian Jew, probably of the second half of the 2nd cent. bc, author of a commentary on the Pentateuch which is known only through quotations by Clement of Alexandria ...
Arius

Arius  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. 336), heresiarch. Probably born in Libya between c.260 and 280, he was ordained in Alexandria and put in charge of one of the main churches there. About 319 he came forward as a champion of ...
Armenian literature

Armenian literature  

Armenian literature begins with the invention of an individual script by Mesrop Mas̆tocʼ (c.360–439). Although familiar with Greek and Syriac, Armenian church leaders needed a written form of ...

View: