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escheat

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allodial

allodial  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
An absolute form of land holding in which the entire estate is vested in the owners, subject only to liability to escheat (see also fee).
compotus rolls

compotus rolls  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
Accounts of royal and seigneurial estates. The records of royal escheators are kept in The National Archives under E 136 and 357. The compoti of manorial lords are mostly housed in local record ...
fee

fee  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.A legal estate (other than leasehold) in land that is capable of being inherited. Since the Law of Property Act 1925 the term's only modern significance is in the phrase fee simple absolute in ...
inquisition post mortem

inquisition post mortem  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
An inquest held by the king's escheator or his deputy after the death of a tenant‐in‐chief of the Crown to establish the extent of the estate and to confirm the rightful heir. A jury of twelve local ...
Leihezwang

Leihezwang  

Nineteenth-century scholarly term referring to the expectation, based on a variety of customs and contracts, that lords in the German Empire, especially rulers and princes, should grant escheats ...
Mortmain

Mortmain  

In the proper sense, mortmain was the incapacity to perform any legal act. Serfs “had dead hands”. The term was also used for properties that passed into ecclesiastical ownership and ...
Quia Emptores

Quia Emptores  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
(medieval Latin, because the buyers)A statute of Edward I (1290) preventing tenants from alienating their lands to others by subinfeudation. See also Quo Warranto, an accompanying measure designed to ...
statute of Mortmain

statute of Mortmain  

1279.Mortmain refers to property held by a ‘dead hand’ and therefore inalienable. Kings and barons objected to persons granting their land to a religious institution and receiving it back again, ...
statute of Westminster

statute of Westminster  

1290.The statute 18 Edw. I, known as Westminster III, was intended to prevent magnates being deprived of their feudal rights, such as escheat, marriage, or wardship, by the sale of estates. It is ...

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