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alcohol

alcohol  

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n. any of a class of organic compounds formed when a hydroxyl group (–OH) is substituted for a hydrogen atom in a hydrocarbon. The alcohol in alcoholic drinks is ethyl alcohol (ethanol), which has ...
ATP

ATP  

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(adenosine triphosphate) a compound that contains adenine, ribose, and three phosphate groups and occurs in cells. The chemical bonds of the phosphate groups store energy needed by the cell, for ...
basal metabolic rate

basal metabolic rate  

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The minimum energy required by the body to sustain metabolism, measured by oxygen consumption and expressed in kilojoules per square meter of body surface.
caffeine

caffeine  

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(kaf-een)an alkaloid drug, present in coffee and tea, that has a stimulant action on the central nervous system and is a weak diuretic. It is included in some analgesic preparations.
calorie

calorie  

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The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1°C (1 K). The calorie, a c.g.s. unit, is now largely replaced by the joule, an SI unit. 1 calorie = 4.186 8 joules.
calorimeter

calorimeter  

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n. any apparatus used to measure the heat lost or gained during various chemical and physical changes. For example, calorimeters may be used to determine the total energy values of different foods in ...
dissipative force

dissipative force  

A force that causes a loss of energy (considered as consisting of kinetic energy and potential energy). A resistive force is dissipative because the work done by it is negative.
ecological energetics

ecological energetics  

The study of how energy is used within an ecosystem, particularly by tracing the movement of energy through a food web.
electricity

electricity  

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Any effect resulting from the existence of stationary or moving electric charges.
electromagnetic radiation

electromagnetic radiation  

The energy that is transmitted through space in the form of electromagnetic waves, which include light, radio waves, X‐rays, and gamma rays. See also radiation.
energetics

energetics  

The study of how energy is transferred and used in a system, such as an ecosystem.
energy

energy   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
39 words

symbol: E; the capacity of a system for doing work. There are various forms of energy – potential,

energy

energy   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
The capacity for doing work. The SI unit for energy is the joule, although the calorie is still commonly used in nutritional studies. There are many different interconvertible forms of ... More
energy

energy   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
139 words

In physics, capacity for doing work. It is measured in joules (J). Power, the rate at which energy

energy

energy   Reference library

Lawrence Sklar

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
563 words
Early work on statics indicated that the product of force times distance, later called work, was an essential organizing concept. The capacity of something to produce or generate work ... More
energy flow

energy flow  

(in ecology)The flow of energy that occurs along a food chain. Energy enters the food chain at the level of the producers (usually plants) in the form of solar energy. The plants convert solar energy ...
energy intensity

energy intensity  

The amount of energy used per unit of activity, such as litres of fuel per passenger‐mile, or energy consumption per pound/dollar of gross domestic product. Also known as fuel intensity.
energy recovery

energy recovery  

The process of extracting useful energy from waste, such as the heat produced by incineration or by harnessing methane gas from landfills.
energy source

energy source  

Any material that is used to produce energy, including fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas), nuclear (fission and fusion), and renewables (solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, hydroelectric).
enthalpy

enthalpy  

Symbol H. A thermodynamic property of a system defined by H = U+pV, where H is the enthalpy, U is the internal energy of the system, p its pressure, and V its volume. In a chemical reaction carried ...

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