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Emancipation Proclamation

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abolitionism

abolitionism  

A term associated with protest on grounds of inhumanity and a call for the abolition of slavery (see, for example, the arguments of William Wilberforce, 1759–1833). More recently extended to the ...
Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln  

(1809–65)US Republican statesman, 16th President of the USA (1861–65). His election as President on an anti‐slavery platform antipathetic to the interests of the southern states helped precipitate ...
African American Religion.

African American Religion.  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The religious beliefs of so large and diverse a population cannot be unified into a single, artificial scheme. The African dispersion has now mingled with many other sources, and black ...
African-American troops

African-American troops  

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Overview Page
Variously called negro, coloured, and black, the history of African-American soldiers is that of US race relations in general. Even after the abolition of formal discrimination by colour, advancement ...
Antislavery Movement

Antislavery Movement  

Frederick Douglass was perhaps the perfect embodiment of the American antislavery movement. As a young slave on a large Maryland plantation, he rebelled both physically and psychologically against ...
Battle of Antietam

Battle of Antietam  

(17 September 1862)A battle in the American Civil War, fought in Maryland. After his victory at the second battle of Bull Run, General Lee invaded the North, but with only 30,000 men under his ...
Black Abolitionists

Black Abolitionists  

Historians acknowledge the existence of “two abolitionisms” in the antebellum United States—one black, one white. Although black and white abolitionists shared similar views about the moral evil of ...
Black Theology

Black Theology  

Black Theology is a comprehensive term that developed out of both religious and quasi-secular aspirations of oppressed black people and was first used among a small group of African American ...
Carl Schurz

Carl Schurz  

˜oorts; ˜ǝrts(1829–1906) Union army officer, secretary of the interior, and U.S. senator. Schurz grew up in Germany, where he allied himself with those who sought democratic reforms. Wanted for ...
Charles Sumner

Charles Sumner  

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Overview Page
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Literature
(1811–74),Boston lawyer, was elected on the Free-Soil ticket to the U.S. Senate (1851), where he became the spearhead of New England liberal opposition to the South. His vehement oratory ...
Draft Riots

Draft Riots  

Violent demonstrations in New York City in July 1863 against a newly enacted conscription law. The law was seen to unfairly discriminate against the poor since anyone able to pay ...
Edwin M. Stanton

Edwin M. Stanton  

(1814–69) attorney general and secretary of war. An Ohioan he moved to Washington, D.C., where he cultivated some political relationships and took on cases that brought him notice. A Democrat ...
Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry Regiment

Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry Regiment  

Although the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Infantry was not the first African American unit to serve or fight in the Civil War, it became the most celebrated black unit of the war ...
freedmen

freedmen  

 Emancipated slaves were more prominent in Roman society than in Greek city‐states or Hellenistic kingdoms (see slavery). Lat. lībertus/a designates the ex‐slave in relation to former owner ...
Gettysburg Address

Gettysburg Address  

A speech delivered by President Abraham Lincoln at a dedication ceremony on November 19, 1863, four months after the Battle of Gettysburg, for the Soldiers' National Cemetery at the Gettysburg ...
Juneteenth

Juneteenth  

In the US, 19 June, originally a holiday in Texas marking the day on which slaves there were emancipated.
Lewis Tappan

Lewis Tappan  

(b. 23 May 1788; d. 21 June 1873), evangelical reformer and abolitionist.Lewis Tappan was born in Northampton, Massachusetts. His father, Benjamin, was a goldsmith and later owned the general ...
Mary Todd Lincoln

Mary Todd Lincoln  

(b. 13 December 1818; d. 16 July 1882), first lady.Mary Ann Todd was born to a slave-owning family in Lexingto3n, Kentucky. Although she was raised in privileged circumstances among ...
Military

Military  

The African American contribution to victories in the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812 was substantial. African American ground forces in the Revolutionary War numbered about five thousand, and ...
Monuments, Museums, Public Markers

Monuments, Museums, Public Markers  

During the “Fusion” years after the end of Reconstruction (1877–1890) the U.S. Army offered opportunity to many African Americans. Wherever it campaigned in the West, mainly in mopping-up operations ...

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