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Achilles Tatius

Achilles Tatius  

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Greek novelist from Alexandria, author of ‘The Story of Leucippe and Cleitophon’ (Ta kata Leukippēn kai Kleitophōnta) in eight books. Shown by papyri to be circulating by the late 2nd cent. ad, it ...
Adulis

Adulis  

On the west coast of the Red Sea (at Zulla in Annesley Bay near Massawa), was used by Ptolemy II and III for elephant-hunts (see elephants), and became an important ...
Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great  

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[Na]Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of Greece in 336 bc. ...
Apameia

Apameia  

(᾽Απάμεια) on the Orontes River, now Arab village of Qalʿat al-Muḍīq in modern Syria; capital city and metropolitan bishopric of the province of Syria II that was formed between 413 and 417.[...]
Ardea

Ardea  

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A city of the Rutuli, a Latin people. Although 4.5 km. (3 mi.) from the sea, it served as a port for Latium. First settled in the bronze age, its ...
battle of Magnesia

battle of Magnesia  

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The decisive battle of the war between Rome and the Seleucid Antiochus III was fought near Magnesia by Mt. Sipylus in Lydia, in 189 bc. The nominal Roman commander was Cornelius Scipio Asiagenes, ...
battle of Raphia

battle of Raphia  

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Takes its name from a town in southern Palestine where Ptolemy (1) IV defeated Antiochus (3) III (23 June 217 bc). Ptolemy had 5000 cavalry and 73 African elephants, but ...
battle of Zama

battle of Zama  

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Zama is the name given to the final battle of the Second Punic War, though it was not actually fought near any of the places so called. Hannibal had perhaps 36,000 infantry, 4,000 cavalry and 80 ...
Berenice

Berenice  

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The name of several Ptolemaic dynastic foundations. Among the best known are:(a) Berenice (mod. Benghazi), the westernmost Cyrenaican city, founded in the mid-3rd cent. bc (exact date and ...
Caecilius Metellus, Lucius

Caecilius Metellus, Lucius  

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(RE 72)consul 251 bc, served in Sicily where, in June 250, he won a great victory over the Carthaginians at Panormus, capturing many elephants (the coins of the Caecilii ...
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species  

An international agreement, launched under the auspices of the IUCN in 1975, designed to regulate trade in endangered wildlife and thus help to conserve those species. It has been signed by 132 ...
Cornēlius Scīpiō Aemiliānus Africānus (Numantīnus), Publius

Cornēlius Scīpiō Aemiliānus Africānus (Numantīnus), Publius  

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B. 185/4 bc as second son of Aemilius Paullus (2), adopted as a child by Cornelius Scipio, son of Cornelius Scipio Africanus. In 168 he fought under Paullus at Pydna. Back in Rome, he met Polybius, ...
fauna

fauna  

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All the animal life normally present in a given habitat at a given time. See also macrofauna; microfauna. Compare flora.
Gnaeus Octavius

Gnaeus Octavius  

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(RE 17)was one of two envoys sent to various Greek states by C. Hostilius Mancinus in 170 bc, assuring them of their rights and strengthening their loyalty to Rome. ...
Hannibal

Hannibal  

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(247–182bc),Carthaginian general. In the second Punic War he attacked Italy via the Alps, which he crossed with elephants; he repeatedly defeated the Romans, but failed to take Rome itself. After ...
Hydaspēs

Hydaspēs  

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River of the Punjab, where Alexander (2) the Great defeated Porus in 326 bc. After continually stretching the enemy by marching and countermarching along the river, Alexander crossed it before dawn ...
Ipsus

Ipsus  

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Small town in central Phrygia, precise location unknown, where Antigonus (1) the One-eyed was defeated and killed by Lysimachus and Seleucus (1) I in 301 bc, in a battle in ...
ivory

ivory  

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[Ma]Animal tusk, usually from the elephant, walrus, or narwhal. In Palaeolithic times, tusk from mammoth was also used.
mammoth

mammoth  

A large extinct elephant of the Pleistocene epoch, typically hairy with a sloping back and long curved tusks. Recorded from the early 18th century, the word comes from Russian mamo(n)t, and is ...
mastodon

mastodon  

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Any of several species of extinct elephantine mammals, all of which existed mainly in the pleistocene epoch. Mastodons had a long coat of red hair; the grinding teeth were notably ...

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