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Antigrapheus

Antigrapheus  

(ἀντιγραφεύς), in the Kletorologion of Philotheos a subordinate of the quaestor. According to Bury (Adm. System 75f), antigrapheis were successors of the late Roman magistri scriniorum under the ...
apology

apology  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In the literary sense, a justification or defence of the writer's opinions or conduct, not usually implying (as in the everyday sense) any admission of blame. The major classical precedent is the ...
Blinding

Blinding  

(τύφλωσις) as a punishment did not exist in the law of Justinian I; the evidence concerning the blinding of Christian martyrs during the persecution is probably legendary. The first certain ...
booty

booty  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
‘It is a law established for all time among all men that when a city is taken in war, the persons and the property of its inhabitants belong to the captors’ (Xenophon, Cyropaedia). ‘Booty’ referred ...
civil law

civil law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
1 The law of any particular state, now usually called municipal law.2 Roman law.3 A legal system based on Roman law, as distinct from the English system of common law.4 Private law, as opposed to ...
Constantine the Philosopher

Constantine the Philosopher  

(monastic name Cyril), missionary to the Slavs and saint; born Thessalonike 826/7, died Rome 14 Feb. 869; feastday 14 Feb. Constantine and his brother Methodios were the sons of the ...
Ecloga Aucta

Ecloga Aucta  

An adaptation of the Ecloga. Designated in one MS as the “second Eklogadion,” it probably antedates the Macedonian period. As far as can be determined from the indirect (Ecloga privata ...
Ecloga Privata Aucta

Ecloga Privata Aucta  

A compilation of the Ecloga and Ecloga aucta. It is itself poorly transmitted, but nonetheless provides crucial evidence for the text of the Ecloga aucta. The prooimion, preserved in only one MS, ...
Epanagoge Aucta

Epanagoge Aucta  

A law book that consists of 54 titles and an appendix; it is based on the Epanagoge and, from Title 17 onward, the Prochiron. The Basilika were also used as ...
execution

execution  

1 The process of carrying out a sentence of death imposed by a court. See also capital punishment.2 The completion of the formalities necessary for a written document to become legally valid. In the ...
Farmer's Law

Farmer's Law  

Regulatory text from Byzantium found in numerous MSS after the 10th century, dated by scholars variously from the 7th to the 9th centuries. It consists of eighty-five regulations mostly related ...
Law In Slavic Countries, Byzantine

Law In Slavic Countries, Byzantine  

Byz. law was introduced into Slavic lands along with Orthodox dogma and liturgy in the wake of Byz. missionary work in the area. In Great Moravia part of the Synagoge ...
Law In the East, Byzantine

Law In the East, Byzantine  

A part of early Byz. canon law survived among the Eastern churches after their separation from the church of Constantinople in the 5th C. But with the exception of Georgia ...
Law, Vulgar

Law, Vulgar  

An expression coined by the legal historian E. Levy to characterize the law of the late Roman Empire in the West. The expression refers not only to the formal elements ...
Leo III

Leo III  

(c. 680–741)Byzantine emperor (717–41). He repulsed several Muslim invasions and carried out an extensive series of financial, legal, administrative, and military reforms. In 726 he forbade the use ...
Mosaic Law

Mosaic Law  

More fully titled “Excerpts from the Law Given by God through Moses to the Israelites,” a collection of passages from Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy that is preserved in dozens ...
mutilation

mutilation  

The infliction of serious bodily injury so as to disfigure or disable. It is a war crime so classified by Article 8 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.
Nomos Stratiotikos

Nomos Stratiotikos  

(Νόμος στρατιωτικός; Lat. Leges militares, “Soldier's Law”), a collection of approximately 55 regulations, mainly penal and disciplinary, for soldiers.Manuscript TraditionThe extensive MS tradition ...
Peculium Castrense

Peculium Castrense  

(στρατιωτικὸν πεκούλιον). The 8th-C. Ecloga (16.1) defines peculium castrense as goods (i.e., wages, Booty, legacies, etc.) acquired while in military service, which were the soldier's own to ...
penalty

penalty  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A punishment for a crime. A penalty must be clearly stated before it can be enforced. Article 7 of the European Convention on Human Rights forbids the use of retrospective criminal penalties, and ...

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