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apotheosis

apotheosis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Gk., apo, ‘from’, + theoun, ‘to deify’).The elevation of a human being to the rank and status of a god. See also EUHEMERISM.
bird

bird  

A class (Aves) of endothermic (see endotherm) vertebrates that are adapted for flight, bipedal walking or running, and, in some species, swimming on or below the surface of water; flightless species ...
bird of prey

bird of prey  

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Overview Page
Bird that usually has a sharp, hooked beak and talons with which it captures its prey. Two orders fit this description: the hawks, falcons, eagles, vultures, and secretary bird (order Falconiformes); ...
Chanticleer

Chanticleer  

The cock in Reynard the Fox, and in Chaucer's ‘The Nun's Priest's Tale’ (see Canterbury Tales, 20) as Chauntecleer.
coat of arms

coat of arms  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A shield bearing a person or institution's heraldic bearings. The term derives from the linen surcoat worn by medieval knights over their chain mail. Strictly speaking, only the shield itself can be ...
dialogue

dialogue  

Is extensively used by Chaucer to give a sense of vivid actuality. It can range from formal debate to familiar conversation, covering all kinds of emotional situations and encounters. He ...
experience

experience  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
Along with consciousness, experience is the central focus of the philosophy of mind. Experience is easily thought of as a stream of private events, known only to their possessor, and bearing at best ...
Fintan mac Bóchra

Fintan mac Bóchra  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The only Irishman to survive the biblical Flood, Fintan was a mythical seer whose name is cited in many texts. The Bóchra/Bóchna of his patronymic is never identified; it may refer to his mother or ...
Geffrey

Geffrey  

In The House of Fame (729) the Eagle familiarly addresses Geoffrey Chaucer by his first name.
Goudeles

Goudeles  

(Γουδέλης, fem. Γουδελίνα), a noble Byz. family. The first Goudeles, perhaps of Slavic origin, was blinded by Constantine VIII for his role in a plot organized by Presianos (see Aaronios) ...
Gwernabwy

Gwernabwy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[cf. W gwernen, alder tree].Owner of the celebrated eagle that Culhwch consults in his search for Mabon.
hawk

hawk  

In falconry, any diurnal bird of prey, used in falconry.Hawk is also used to denote a person who advocates an aggressive or warlike policy, especially in foreign affairs; the opposite of a dove.have ...
herberwe

herberwe  

Words for ‘lodging’. One of the obvious necessities of life: man, says the Parson, has need ‘of foode … of clothyng and herberwe’ (X.1030). The need is felt most sharply ...
House of Fame

House of Fame  

An unfinished dream‐poem by Chaucer, composed between 1374 and 1385. There are three books, in 2,158 lines of octosyllabics.After the prologue on dreams and the invocation to the god of sleep, Bk I ...
Ivan III

Ivan III  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1440–1505)Grand Prince of Muscovy (1462). He was responsible for extending the territories of Muscovite Russia, becoming independent of the Tartars, and subjecting the principalities of Livonia and ...
Julian, Seint

Julian, Seint  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Almost certainly an entirely mythical saint, who was falsely associated with one or more genuine saints of this name. He has no date, no country, no tomb: his feast on 29 January in the Acta ...
Koadalan

Koadalan  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Bret, koad, wood; alan, male Christian name; cf. W Coed-Alun, wood-Allen].Title and hero of an episodic Breton folk-tale of magical transformation and denied immortality; the action is so complex ...
Lleu Llaw Gyffes

Lleu Llaw Gyffes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The Welsh equivalent of the Irish Lugh, Lleu Llaw Gyffes was particularly important in the “Fourth Branch” of the epic the Mabinogion. He was the son of Aranrhod, perhaps by ...
nimbus

nimbus  

A luminous cloud or a halo surrounding a supernatural being or a saint. Recorded from the early 17th century, the word is Latin, and means literally ‘cloud, aureole’.
sceptre

sceptre  

An ornamented staff carried by rulers on ceremonial occasions as a symbol of sovereignty; in England, the traditional way of signifying the royal assent to a bill was by the sovereign's touching it ...

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