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Anna Murray Douglass

(c. 1813—1882)

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Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In

Baltimore, Maryland, Slavery In  

Although it was by and large a slave city, Baltimore boasted a large free black population, which included Frederick Douglass's wife, Anna Murray, who worked for a postman on the ...
Caulker's Trade

Caulker's Trade  

As a caulker in Baltimore, Maryland, a major site of American shipbuilding, from 1836 to 1838, Frederick Douglass put sealant between the boards of hulls to make ships watertight. He ...
Charles Remond Douglass

Charles Remond Douglass  

(b. 21 October 1844; d. 24 November 1920), soldier, journalist, and government clerk.Born in Lynn, Massachusetts, Charles Remond Douglass was the third and youngest son of Frederick and Anna ...
Feminist Movement

Feminist Movement  

Feminism is the belief that women should be equal to men in the economic, social, and political spheres. Feminism also refers to political and intellectual movements among diverse groups of ...
Free African Americans Before the Civil War (South)

Free African Americans Before the Civil War (South)  

In the decade before the Civil War, there were approximately 500,000 free African Americans in the United States, with the population split nearly equally between the free and slave states. ...
Harriet Bailey

Harriet Bailey  

(b. c. 1820; d. 22 April 1900), a fugitive slave.Ruth Cox Adams, a fugitive slave from Maryland, adopted the name Harriet Bailey and lived with Frederick Douglass and his ...
Julia Griffiths Crofts

Julia Griffiths Crofts  

(b. c. 1821; d. c. 1895), British abolitionist.One of the more controversial figures in the life of Frederick Douglass, Julia Griffiths also proved to be one of his most ...
Legal Resistance

Legal Resistance  

Black women in America have been uniquely oppressed. Not surprisingly, the form, substance, and successes of their methods of resistance to such oppression have been marked by a singularly complex ...
Lewis Henry Douglass

Lewis Henry Douglass  

(b. 9 October 1840; d. 9 October 1908), a civil rights activistand a son of Frederick Douglass. Born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, Lewis Henry Douglass was the second child ...
mixed marriage

mixed marriage  

A marriage between Christians of different denominations or of a Christian and an unbaptized person. The term is used especially when one of the parties is a RC; such marriages still require the ...
mulatto

mulatto  

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The hybrid from a Negro-white cross.
Nathan Johnson

Nathan Johnson  

(b. c. 1794–1797; d. 1880), the prominent black businessman and abolitionistwho gave Frederick Douglass his last name. No photograph or sketch of Nathan Johnson is known to exist, and ...
Nonresistance

Nonresistance  

In September 1838, ultraistic peace activists and Garrisonian abolitionists (often one and the same), meeting in Boston, established the New England Non-Resistance Society. From its inception the ...

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