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double effect

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absolutism, moral

absolutism, moral  

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Overview Page
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Philosophy
The view that certain kinds of actions are always wrong or are always obligatory, whatever the consequences. Typical candidates for such absolute principles would be that it is always wrong ...
acts/omissions doctrine

acts/omissions doctrine  

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Overview Page
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Philosophy
The doctrine that it makes an ethical difference whether an agent actively intervenes to bring about a result, or omits to act in circumstances in which it is foreseen that as a result of the ...
ends and means

ends and means  

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Overview Page
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Philosophy
The end of an action is that for the sake of which it is performed; the means is the way in which the end is to be achieved. The distinction arises in connection with various moral principles (you ...
per accidens

per accidens  

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Philosophy
(Latin, by accident)In scholastic thought that which is per accidens belongs to a substance more or less fortuitously, and is contrasted with that which is per se, or through itself, i.e. that ...
principle

principle  

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Philosophy
The history of philosophy abounds in principles: the principle of sufficient reason, Hume's principle (‘No ought from an is’), the principle of double effect … A principle will often be ...
trolley problem

trolley problem  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
Problem in ethics posed by the English philosopher Philippa Foot in her ‘The Problem of Abortion and the Doctrine of the Double Effect’ (Oxford Review, 1967). A runaway train or trolley comes to a ...

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