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John Donne

(1572—1631) poet and Church of England clergyman

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Anne Clifford

Anne Clifford  

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Literature
Lady Anne Clifford (1590–1676), countess of Dorset, Pembroke, and Montgomery, was one of the most powerful noblewomen in England, and at her death one of the richest. Her life was ...
aubade

aubade  

(Provençal, alba; German, Tagelied),a dawn song, usually describing the regret of two lovers at their imminent separation. The form (which has no strict metrical pattern) flourished with the ...
biography

biography  

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A narrative history of the life of some person; or the practice of writing such works. Most biographies provide an account of the life of a notable individual from birth to death, or in the case of ...
Cavalier poets

Cavalier poets  

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Literature
A collective term applied by some literary historians to a group of English lyric poets of the Caroline period, and derived from the popular designation for supporters of King Charles in the Civil ...
Charles Cotton

Charles Cotton  

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Literature
(1630–87),wrote the dialogue between Piscator and Viator which forms the second part in the fifth edition of The Compleat Angler (1676). He also published Scarronides (1664), a burlesque of Virgil, ...
Chichester

Chichester  

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Literature
(Roman). The civitas‐capital of the Reg(i)ni; its Roman name was Noviomagus. The Roman town developed early. This can be ascribed to the influence of the pro‐Roman king Cogidubnus, mentioned on two ...
conceit

conceit  

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Literature
An elaborate metaphor comparing two apparently dissimilar objects or emotions, often with an effect of shock or surprise. The Petrarchan conceit, much imitated by Elizabethan sonneteers and both used ...
dissociation of sensibility

dissociation of sensibility  

T. S. Eliot's term for a separation of thought from feeling which he held to be first manifested in poetry of the later seventeenth century.
Edmund Gosse

Edmund Gosse  

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Literature
Edmund Gosse (1849–1928) was the most influential arbiter of taste during the last two decades of the nineteenth century and the first two decades of the twentieth. Through readable essays ...
Edmund Waller

Edmund Waller  

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Literature
(1606–87),entered Parliament early and was at first an active member of the opposition. Later he became a Royalist, and in 1643 was leader in a plot to seize London for Charles I. For this he was ...
Edward Alleyn

Edward Alleyn  

(1566–1626),an actor (R. Burbage's chief rival) and partner of Henslowe, with whom he built the Fortune Theatre, Cripplegate. There he acted at the head of the Lord Admiral's company, playing among ...
elegy

elegy  

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Literature
(Fr.).A song of lament for the dead or for some melancholy event, or an instr. comp. with that suggestion, such as Elgar's Elegy for Strings and Fauré's Élégie.
English Literature

English Literature  

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British sea literature includes every work of imaginative, dramatic, aesthetic, or symbolic quality within the wider range of British writing relating to the sea, whether imagination re-creates fact ...
Epigrams

Epigrams  

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Literature
A collection of poems by Jonson, printed 1616, including ‘Inviting a Friend to Supper’, ‘On My First Son’, ‘The Famous Voyage’, and addresses to Donne and King James.
Everard Guilpin

Everard Guilpin  

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Literature
(fl.1598)English poet Skialetheia; or, A Shadow of Truth, in Certaine Epigrams or Satyres (1598) PoetryThe Whipper of the Satyre his Pennance in a White Sheete (1601) PoetrySkialetheia; or, A Shadow ...
F. R. Leavis

F. R. Leavis  

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Literature
(1895–1978)British literary critic and university teacher. He was made a CH in 1978.Leavis was educated at Cambridge, first at the Perse School and then at Emmanuel College, where he taught from ...
flea poems

flea poems  

A genre of poems in which a flea is satirically presented as the rival of the lover, who is jealous of the flea's access to his beloved's body. In Romance ...
Francis Turner Palgrave

Francis Turner Palgrave  

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Literature
(1824–97),professor of poetry at Oxford, 1885–95. He is chiefly remembered for his anthology The Golden Treasury of Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language (1861; 2nd series, 1897). In ...
Francisco de Quevedo y Villegas

Francisco de Quevedo y Villegas  

(1580–1645),Spanish poet, satirist, and picaresque novelist, born in Madrid, the son of the secretary to Princess Maria, daughter of Charles V. He was educated at Alcalá de Henares and ...
George Herbert

George Herbert  

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Literature
(1593–1633)Church of England clergyman of the Laudian persuasion, whose poetry (collected together in The Temple in the year of his death) was widely appreciated because of its homely imagery.

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