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Dionysius

(c. 170 bc — 190 ad)

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Albert the Great

Albert the Great  

(1200–80),Dominican friar and bishop. A Swabian by birth, Albert joined the Dominicans at Padua in 1223 against the wishes of his noble family. After teaching at Hildesheim, Ratisbon, and Cologne, ...
ancient linguistics

ancient linguistics  

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1. Linguistics arose in western antiquity from two rather different sources: philosophical debate on the origin and nature of language, and the practical requirements of textual criticism and the ...
angel

angel  

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Religion
Hermes was the messenger of Zeus. Iris was ascribed the same function; for Plato the two are the divine angeloi. By the 3rd cent. ad, angels played a large part in Judaism and Christianity, and they ...
Apollonius (13)

Apollonius (13)  

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Son of Mnesitheus, nicknamed Dyscolus, of Alexandria (1) (2nd c. ad). Of his life little is known; apart from a short visit to Rome, he did not leave Alexandria, and ...
Apollonius Dyscolus

Apollonius Dyscolus  

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Greek grammarian, working in Alexandria in the 2nd century CE.His work on syntax was very influential.See also History of Linguistics, article on Ancient Greece and Rome.Anna Morpurgo Davies[...]
apophatic theology

apophatic theology  

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Religion
A way of approaching God by denying that any of our concepts can be properly affirmed of Him. It is contrasted with affirmative and symbolic theology. The soul rejects all ideas and images of God and ...
Areopagite

Areopagite  

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Religion
The mystical writer, Dionysius (6) (? 5th cent.), so named from a wrong identification with the Dionysius who was converted by St Paul's speech on the Areopagus (Acts 17: 34).[...]
Aristarchus

Aristarchus  

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Of Samothrace (c.216–144 bc), sat at the feet of Aristophanes of Byzantium at Alexandria. He became head of the Alexandrian Library c.153. On the accession of Ptolemy VIII (145) he left Alexandria ...
Armenian literature

Armenian literature  

Armenian literature begins with the invention of an individual script by Mesrop Mas̆tocʼ (c.360–439). Although familiar with Greek and Syriac, Armenian church leaders needed a written form of ...
celestial

celestial  

Of or relating to the sky or outer space.
Denis

Denis  

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Religion
An alternative form of Dionysius.
Denys

Denys  

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Religion
An alternative form of Dionysius.
Dionysius the Carthusian

Dionysius the Carthusian  

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Religion
(1402–71), theologian and mystic. Besides commentaries on the Bible, he edited or commented on the works of Boethius, Peter Lombard, John Climacus, and Dionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite, and he wrote ...
Dracon

Dracon  

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Of Stratonicea, in Caria (3rd–2nd cent. bc), predecessor or contemporary of Dionysius (15) Thrax; author of a number of works on grammar, metric, and particular lyric poets (Sappho, Alcaeus (1) ...
Eriugena, John Scottus

Eriugena, John Scottus  

(c.810–c.877)Also known as John the Scot, Eriugena was born in Ireland, achieved a remarkable degree of learning, and taught at the court of Charles the Bald. He is important as a translator and ...
George Choiroboskos

George Choiroboskos  

Grammarian, deacon, and chartophylax of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople; fl. early 9th C.Choiroboskos (Ξοιροβοσκός) was above all active as a teacher and is described in the titles of some ...
Grammar

Grammar  

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Literature
The first vernacular grammar was written exceptionally early (1437–41) by Alberti. He wished to show that contemporary cultured Florentine could be analysed in the same way as Latin, but his ...
grammar, grammarians, Greek

grammar, grammarians, Greek  

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(see linguistics, ancient) Linguistic analysis and classification begin, in Greece, with the 5th-cent. sophists. Their phonetic studies are reflected in the title of a lost work of Democritus, On ...
Hugh of St-Victor

Hugh of St-Victor  

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Religion
(d. 1142), theologian. Little is known of his life except that c.1115 he entered St-Victor, a house of Augustinian Canons in Paris (see Victorines). He wrote on grammar, geometry, and philosophy; the ...
language

language  

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History
The principal languages of early modern Europe consist of six language families (Germanic, Romance, Slavic, Balto-Slavic, Finno-Ugric, and Celtic), a number of isolates (Greek, Albanian, Basque, and ...

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