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Dionysia

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acting

acting  

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In the twentieth century the process of acting underwent more thorough analysis and experimentation than at any other time in the history of Western theatre. Previously, written reflections on the ...
Aeschines

Aeschines  

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(c.397–c.322 bc),Athenian orator whose exchanges with Demosthenes (2) in the courts in 343 and 330 provide much of the evidence for the relations of Athens and Macedon in the 340s and the 330s. His ...
Aeschylus

Aeschylus  

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Athenian tragic poet (?525/4–456/5 bc). He fought in the battle of Marathon. His first tragic production was in 499, his first victory in 484. He gained thirteen victories altogether. His epitaph ...
agōnĕs

agōnĕs  

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1 The term agōn and its derivatives can denote the informal and extempore rivalries that permeated Greek life in the general fight for survival and, success esp. philosophical, legal, and public ...
Alexis

Alexis  

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c.375–c.275bc, poet of Middle and New Comedy, born at Thurii in south Italy (Suda α 1138), but apparently living most of his long life in Athens. He wrote 245 plays (Suda); the first of his two, ...
Ameipsias

Ameipsias  

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Athenian comic poet, contemporary with Aristophanes (1). His Connus (see Phrynichus (2)) was placed second to Cratinus' Pytine and above Aristophanes (1)'s Clouds in 423 bc (hyp. 5 Aristophanes ...
ancient Greek theatre

ancient Greek theatre  

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1. Origins of theatre in Greece; 2. Late Archaic and Classical Greek theatre (508–317 bc); 3. Hellenistic theatre (317–86 bc); 4. Greek theatre under the Roman Empire (86 bc–ad 692); 5. Greek ...
Antigenes

Antigenes  

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(5th cent. bc),Attic dithyrambic poet, who wrote a dedicatory poem for tripods won at the Dionysian competition (see Dionysia) by the Acamantis tribe (see phylai). The poem, preserved at ...
Aristophanes

Aristophanes  

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(c. 450–c. 385 bc),Greek comic dramatist. His surviving plays are characterized by exuberant language and the satirization of leading contemporary figures.
askoliasmos

askoliasmos  

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(ἀσκωλιασμός), a country sport in Attica. The players tried to keep their balance while jumping on an inflated and greasy wine-skin (ἀσκός). It was probably played at many festivals, and ...
Attic cults and myths

Attic cults and myths  

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Most Greek states honoured most Greek gods; the differences between them are of emphasis and degree. As characteristic Athenian emphases one might mention: the extraordinary prominence of Athena, ...
audience

audience  

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The role of the theatre audience has been both preserved and challenged in the twentieth century. The set of conventions for mainstream theatre, requiring a particular response to the on-stage ...
Callias

Callias  

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Athenian comic poet, won first prize at the City Dionysia in 446 bc (Inscriptiones Graecae 22. 2318, col. 3), and was active at least until 430 (Inscriptiones Graecae 14. 1097. ...
Cantharus

Cantharus  

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Athenian comic poet, victorious at the Dionysia in 422 bc (Inscriptiones Graecae 22. 2318. 115=1 col. 8. 17 Mette).FragmentsR. Kassel and C. Austin, Poetae Comici Graeci 4. 57–62 ...
Carcinus

Carcinus  

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Son of Xenocles and grandson of Carcinus (1), a tragic poet who is said to have written 160 plays (Suda). He competed at the Lenaea c.376 bc, and won the ...
Carcinus

Carcinus  

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Son of Xenotimus of the Attic deme of Thoricus, a tragic poet who won a victory at the Dionysia of 446 bc. He made a dedication as a trierarch c.450 ...
carnival

carnival  

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A period of public revelry at a regular time each year, as during the week before Lent in Roman Catholic countries, involving processions, music, dancing, and the use of masquerade. Recorded from the ...
Chionides

Chionides  

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Is treated by Aristotle (De Poetis 1448a33) as one of the two earliest Attic comic poets, and it is probable that he was the first recorded comic victor at the ...
chorēgia

chorēgia  

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At Athens the choregia was a liturgy or public service performed by a rich citizen for the polis. A chorēgos (lit. ‘leader of a chorus’) was responsible for the recruitment, training, maintenance, ...
chorus

chorus  

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In ancient Greek tragedy, a group of performers who comment on the main action, typically speaking and moving together; a single character who speaks the prologue and other linking parts of the play, ...

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