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dentine

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attrition

attrition  

n. (in dentistry) the wearing of tooth surfaces by the action of opposing teeth. A small amount of attrition occurs with age but accelerated wear may occur in bruxism and with certain diets.
Brännström's hydrodynamic theory

Brännström's hydrodynamic theory  

A theory, first described by M. Brännström in 1966, which suggested that dentine hypersensitivity is due to movement of fluid within the dentinal tubules in response to mechanical, osmotic, and ...
calcific metamorphosis

calcific metamorphosis  

A reaction to tooth trauma resulting in partial or complete obliteration of the pulp chamber by secondary dentine.
cementoblast

cementoblast  

A cell that takes part in the formation of cementum. They are formed from the dental follicle following the degeneration of Hertwig's sheath. They form a single layer of cuboidal cells on the surface ...
conditioner

conditioner  

A substance added to dentine to remove the smear layer and debris from a prepared cavity creating an improved bonding surface. A commonly used dentine conditioner is 10% polyacrylic acid.
cosmine

cosmine  

A type of dentine that is perforated by branching canals.
cosmoid scale

cosmoid scale  

A type of scale found only in fossil lungfish (Dipneusti), and in Crossopterygii, including the living coelacanth. The thick scales are composed of layers of vitrodentine, followed by cosmine, and ...
dead tract

dead tract  

An area of empty dentinal tubules beneath a carious lesion where the odontoblasts have died and not laid down sclerotic dentine.
demineralization

demineralization  

A loss or removal of mineral salts from the tissues of the body. It occurs in dentine and enamel as part of the carious process. Enamel starts to demineralize when the plaque or saliva pH drops below ...
denticle

denticle  

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1. A small tooth or tooth-like projection.2. A calcified mass found in the pulp chamber of a tooth also known as an endolith or pulp stone. It may be composed of irregular dentine (true denticle) or ...
dentinogenesis

dentinogenesis  

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n. the formation of dentine by odontoblasts. Although dentinogenesis continues throughout life, very little dentine is formed later than a few years after tooth eruption unless it is stimulated by ...
dentinogenesis imperfecta

dentinogenesis imperfecta  

A disorder that is distinct from osteogenesis imperfecta, being restricted to teeth. Type 1 is caused by mutation in the DSPP gene that encodes dentin phosphoprotein and dentin sialoprotein.
eburnation

eburnation  

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n. the wearing down of the cartilage at the articulating surface of a bone, exposing the underlying bone and leading to bone sclerosis,in which the bone’s surface becomes dense and smooth like ivory. ...
EDTA

EDTA  

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A chelating agent (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) for divalent cations, often used as the disodium salt. Binding affinity is pH sensitive and at neutral pH the affinity for calcium is greater than ...
enamel

enamel  

n. the extremely hard outer covering of the crown of a tooth. It is formed before tooth eruption by ameloblasts and consists of crystalline hydroxyapatite.
ganoid

ganoid  

In some fossil as well as extant bony fish, applied to a type of scale that has a rhomboid shape and consists of a superficial layer of enamel-like ganoine, a middle layer of dentine, and a basal ...
granular layer of Tomes

granular layer of Tomes  

[J. Tomes (1815–95), English dentist] A narrow layer of granular or interglobular dentine found in root dentine immediately adjacent to the cementum.
hypocalcification

hypocalcification  

An insufficient deposition of calcium salts in mineralized tissues (bones or teeth). When it occurs in enamel it is characterized by opaque white spots (see also fluorosis). Hypomineralized ...
ivory

ivory  

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[Ma]Animal tusk, usually from the elephant, walrus, or narwhal. In Palaeolithic times, tusk from mammoth was also used.
mineralization

mineralization  

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The breakdown of organic residues in soils; an essential process in humus formation. See Andriesh (2006) 18th World Congr. Soil Sci.

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