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Aegean Sea

Aegean Sea  

Between Greece and Asia Minor. To it the modern name Archipelago was originally applied, but the ancient Greeks derived the name Aegean variously from Theseus' father Aegeus, who drowned himself ...
Aeneas

Aeneas  

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In classical mythology, a Trojan leader, son of Anchises and Aphrodite, and legendary ancestor of the Romans. When Troy fell to the Greeks he escaped and after wandering for many years eventually ...
Aeschines

Aeschines  

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(c.397–c.322 bc),Athenian orator whose exchanges with Demosthenes (2) in the courts in 343 and 330 provide much of the evidence for the relations of Athens and Macedon in the 340s and the 330s. His ...
Agasias

Agasias  

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Ephesian sculptor, son of Menophilus, active on Delos c.100 bc. A fallen Celt is often associated with one signed base, dedicated by C. Marius; attributions include the bronze ‘Worried Man.’[...]
Anius

Anius  

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Son of Apollo and king of Delos. He prophesied that the Trojan War would last ten years. His mother Rhoeo (Pomegranate) was descended from Dionysus through her father Staphylus (‘Grape’). ...
Anticleides

Anticleides  

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Of Athens (fl. early 3rd cent. bc), wrote a history of Alexander (3) the Great (containing a long digression on Egyptian antiquities), a substantial mythological work reaching into historical times ...
Antipater

Antipater  

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Of Sidon, author of about 75 mainly funerary or ecphrastic epigrams in the Greek Anthology (see anthology). Anthologia Palatina 9. 151 commemorates the sack of Corinth (146 bc). An inscriptional ...
Anubis

Anubis  

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Religion
In ancient Egyptian theology, the god of mummification, protector of tombs, usually represented as having a jackal's head.
Apollo

Apollo  

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In Greek mythology, a god, son of Zeus and Leto and brother of Artemis. He is associated with music, poetic inspiration, archery, prophecy, medicine, pastoral life, and the sun; the sanctuary at ...
archaeology, classical

archaeology, classical  

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The study of the material culture of ancient Greece and Rome. Epigraphy, the study of inscriptions on permanent materials, is today seen as a branch of historical rather than of archaeological ...
Archermus

Archermus  

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6th-cent.Chiot sculptor (see Chios). According to Pliny, Naturalis histiria 36. 11–14, son of Micciades, grandson of Melas, and father of Bupalus and Athenis (fl. 540–537 bc), all sculptors; worked ...
architecture

architecture  

The term given to an organization's information technology platform, structure and process but increasingly used as a way of explaining complex marketing concepts and functions, for example ‘brand ...
Aristides

Aristides  

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An Athenian statesman and general of the 5th century bc, known as Aristides the Just. He commanded the Athenian army at the battle of Plataea, but came into conflict with Themistocles and was ...
artist

artist  

In the MA the artist, or better artifex (‘artificer’), was most frequently considered a practitioner of the mechanical arts. Inextricably linked to his manual activities, he was viewed as a ...
Asteria

Asteria  

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Sister of Leto and mother, by Perses, of Hecate (Hesiod Theogonia 409–12). The fact that she is Leto's sister must be connected with the fact that Asteria (meaning ‘starry’) is ...
Atargatis

Atargatis  

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In Assyrian mythology, a fertility goddess, resembling Astarte, and shown as half-fish, half-woman.
Bacchylides

Bacchylides  

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(c.520–450 bc),Greek lyric poet, nephew of Simonides. Although he was well known in Hellenistic and Roman times, only a handful of lines had survived in quotations when a papyrus containing his book ...
banking

banking  

A system of trading in money which involved safeguarding deposits and making funds available for borrowers, banking developed in the Middle Ages in response to the growing need for credit in ...
basilica

basilica  

A large oblong hall or building with double colonnades and a semicircular apse, used in ancient Rome as a law court or for public assemblies. The name was then applied to a building of this type used ...
Berytus

Berytus  

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A Phoenician city mentioned in the letters of el-Amarna (14th cent. bc) and also attested in the Persian period. From Antiochus (4) IV on it issued a coinage as Laodicea ...

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