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Daniel Defoe

(1660—1731) writer and businessman

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Alexander Selkirk

Alexander Selkirk  

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Overview Page
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History
(1676–1721),British seaman and the model of Robinson Crusoe in the story by the same name written by Daniel Defoe (c.1660–1731). He was born in Lower Largo, Fife, Scotland. In 1703 he volunteered to ...
assembly rooms

assembly rooms  

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Overview Page
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History
Large room or suite of rooms for the reception of large parties, for concerts, dinners, balls, etc. A good example is the assembly-room at York by Burlington (1731–2). Assembly-rooms were an ...
Athenian Gazette

Athenian Gazette  

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Overview Page
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Literature
(later the Athenian Mercury),a periodical published by Dunton, a question‐and‐answer paper, and thus a precursor of Notes and Queries. It first appeared in March 1691 and flourished until 1697.
Bedfordshire

Bedfordshire  

Is a small, low‐lying, and predominantly agricultural county, drained largely by the river Ouse. In pre‐Roman times it formed part of the kingdom of the Catuvellauni. In 571 a victory of the English ...
Bernard Mandeville

Bernard Mandeville  

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Overview Page
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Philosophy
(c.1670–1733)Dutch doctor and moral philosopher. Born in Rotterdam of a distinguished medical family, Mandeville settled in Britain shortly after taking his degree in 1691. He is known for The Fable ...
Bradford

Bradford  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Though Bradford received a charter as early as 1251, it remained a cloth town of local importance. During the 17th cent. it lost ground. Celia Fiennes in the 1690s did not mention it and Defoe in the ...
Charles Leslie

Charles Leslie  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(1650–1722), Nonjuror. Deprived of his benefice in Ireland, he came to London in 1689. His most celebrated work was an attack on Deist philosophy, A Short and Easy Method with the Deists (1698).
Colonel Jack

Colonel Jack  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A romance of adventure by Defoe, published 1722.
constable

constable  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
One of the great medieval offices of state, derived from comes stabuli, count of the stables. The first lord high constable was a supporter of the Empress Matilda, who made him earl of Hereford. It ...
country

country  

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Overview Page
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History
The word ‘country’ was used not only for describing the whole of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, etc., but more imprecisely to convey a sense of a district much wider ...
Devon

Devon  

Was the third largest of the old counties. Having two sea‐coasts, it was orientated in different directions, the northern shore along the Bristol channel, the south shore along the English channel. ...
dissenting academies

dissenting academies  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
The Act of Uniformity (1662) excluded dissenting ministers from their posts. Many, out of necessity, became teachers. Dissenting academies were particularly popular in Devon, Lancashire, London, and ...
docks

docks  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Maps, prospects, and travellers' accounts, notably those of Defoe, are useful sources for the 18th century. The construction of a dock sometimes required a private Act of Parliament; maps and ...
dramatizations and dramatizers of Dickens's works

dramatizations and dramatizers of Dickens's works  

Partly because staged pantomime of children's stories had helped establish the 18th-century custom, what a multitude of 19th-century playwrights did with the plenitude of Boz was only what the stage ...
Eighteenth-Century Journalism

Eighteenth-Century Journalism  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
The story of eighteenth-century journalism is arguably the story of modernity. It transcends literary history and, in its complexity, challenges a number of assumptions about the nature of ...
Elio Vittorini

Elio Vittorini  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1908–66)Italian novelist, critic, translator, and literary editor; he was responsible for introducing into Italian literature many of the techniques of modern American fiction. He translated works ...
English Literature

English Literature  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
British sea literature includes every work of imaginative, dramatic, aesthetic, or symbolic quality within the wider range of British writing relating to the sea, whether imagination re-creates fact ...
essays and essayists before Dickens

essays and essayists before Dickens  

In its many guises—familiar, critical, polemical, or philosophical—and as a publishing mode, the essay held a place in Dickens's idea of literature that was second to none. The 18th-century authors ...
geese

geese  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
All one's geese are swans one characteristically exaggerates the merits of undistinguished persons or things; the use of goose and swan to point up such a contrast dates back to the 16th century (in ...
gentry

gentry  

Technically the gentry consists of four separately defined groups, socially inferior only to the ranks of the peerage. The senior rank is that of baronet, a position founded in 1611 by James I giving ...

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