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decorum

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classicism

classicism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
1. The classical aesthetic ideals of simplicity, form, order, harmony, balance, clarity, decorum, restraint, serenity, unity, and proportion—together with an emphasis on reason. The term is not ...
Contingency and Probability

Contingency and Probability  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
For Aristotle (384–322 bce), the contingent is the unproblematic scene of rhetoric. This Aristotelian connection between the scene and agency (or practice), originally put into play to blunt Plato's ...
Decorum

Decorum   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
7,124 words
Illustration(s):
1

The classical concept of decorum embodies many of the paradoxical features of the art of rhetoric: It is at once

decorum

decorum   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
523 words

The Latin word decorum, the equivalent of the Greek prepon or harmotton, expressed one of the most pervasive

decorum

decorum   Reference library

W. D. Howarth

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
346 words

The bienséances, an unwritten code of what was fitting or not fitting to be shown on stage, no less powerful than the doctrine of the ...

decorum

decorum   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
96 words

[from the Latin decorus, ‘seemly’]

Originally a literary term, it is first used in relation to the visual arts in the ...

Eloquence

Eloquence  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Modern usage applies the concept of eloquence in various ways, at times with an implication of distrust, as if a choice had to be made between art and sincerity. But ...
Ethopoeia

Ethopoeia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
(Lat. notatio)designates a textual unit, in which the individual nature of a given character is imitated through the assignment to that character of specific discourses or speech.The most ...
Forensic genre

Forensic genre  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
In forensic, or legal, rhetoric, the speaker addresses a jury or judge selected to adjudicate issues surrounding a past event. Through pro and con argumentation by prosecution and defense (forensic ...
genre

genre  

A grouping of texts related within the system of literature by their sharing features of form and content. Ancient theoretical discussions of specific literary genres operate according to criteria ...
Horace

Horace  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(65–8bc),Roman poet of the Augustan period. A notable satirist and literary critic, he is best known for his Odes, much imitated by later ages, especially by the poets of 17th-century England.
horizon of expectations

horizon of expectations  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
The shared ‘mental set’ or framework within which those of a particular generation in a culture understand, interpret, and evaluate a text or an artwork. This includes textual knowledge of ...
Jean Mairet

Jean Mairet  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1604–86)French dramatist. A rival of Corneille, Mairet is generally regarded as responsible for the introduction of the three unities into serious French drama, first in a preface to Silvanire ...
Juan de la Cueva

Juan de la Cueva  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1550–1610)Spanish poet and playwright. A prolific writer for the stage, he is distinguished by his blatant disregard for the neoclassical unities, his reduction of the traditional number of acts ...
Kairos

Kairos  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
Is variously described in relation to a temporality and to a way of acting: it is the opportune moment. Be that as it may, it is an elusive word, appearing ...
laughter

laughter  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
We laugh at things that are laughable, but also laugh exultantly at a success, or bitterly at a failure, or at the unexpected or even the typical. We may even laugh but not at anything—with pure joy, ...
Lope de Vega

Lope de Vega  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(1562–1635)Spanish dramatist. Born in Madrid, the son of an embroiderer, he attended a Jesuit school and probably the University of Alcalá. He served a long series of noble masters ...
neoclassicism

neoclassicism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The revival of a classical style or treatment in art, literature, architecture, or music. As an aesthetic and artistic style this originated in Rome in the mid 18th century, combining a reaction ...
Nineteenth-Century rhetoric

Nineteenth-Century rhetoric  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
The discipline of nineteenth-century American rhetoric—the focus of this article, although many of the enumerated characteristics pertain to nineteenth-century European rhetoric as well—was founded ...
Occasion

Occasion  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
We have become accustomed to thinking of all communicative situations as rhetorical. Aristotle (384–322 bce) himself opines (Rhetoric 2.18) that rhetoric is at play even in a conversation involving ...

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