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Áed

Áed  

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Overview Page
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Religion
1 Son of Ainmire in the Cycle of Kings and father of Domnall (1).2 The son of Eochaid Lethderg, prince of Leinster, who was carried off to a brugh, or palace of fairyland, by two women of the sídh ...
Áed Minbhrec

Áed Minbhrec  

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Religion
A son of the Dagda and a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Wrongly accused of adultery by a jealous husband, Áed Minibhrec was murdered before his father's eyes. His sídh was near Ballyshannon, Co. ...
Ainge

Ainge  

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Religion
A daughter of the Dagda. When twigs Ainge was gathering were stolen by Gaible, son of Nuadu, they became a forest springing up in every direction.
Angus Óg

Angus Óg  

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Religion
[Ir., young Angus, Angus son of youth; mac Óc, mac Óg, young son].Angus Óg is the god of youth and beauty among the Tuatha Dé Danann; he may also be the god of love, if any such god can be said to ...
Annwn

Annwn  

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Religion
In Celtic mythology, the underworld, ruled over by Arawn.
Aonghus

Aonghus  

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Religion
Aonghus Og (Oenghus), son of the Dagda and Boann, and foster father to Diarmuid, was the beautiful love god of Irish mythology. Many stories are told of him. In one ...
Badb

Badb  

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Religion
Badb (Badhbh, Bodhbh) was a triune Celtic goddess of sorcery, war, and death in the Irish tradition. Often taking the form of a screaming raven or crow, she terrifies and ...
Boand

Boand  

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Religion
[Ir. boänd, bóinn, she who has white cows (?)].Pre-Christian goddess of the Boyne River and the river itself, the 70-mile principal waterway of eastern Ireland. Boand was a sister of Bébinn and in ...
Bodb

Bodb  

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Religion
Usually with the agnomen Derg, Dearg [Ir., Bodb the red]. A son (sometimes brother) of the Dagda and his successor as leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Bodb is described as having two residences, at ...
Bríg,

Bríg,  

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[Ir., high, noble, power (?)].A daughter of the Dagda whose son Rúadán is killed by Goibniu. In her grief she gives the first mourning chant or keen [Ir. caoineadh] in Ireland.
Brigit

Brigit  

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Religion
[Ir., the exalted one].Pre-Christian Irish goddess of fire, smithing, fertility, cattle, crops, and poetry. She was the daughter of the Dagda and according to later tradition, the wife of Senchán ...
Brug na Bóinne

Brug na Bóinne  

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Religion
[Ir., Brú: a) bank of a river, b) hostel, c) womb; of the Boyne].The otherworldly residence first of Boand and of the Dagda but later, more importantly, of Angus Óg, Irish god of youth and poetry. It ...
Caitlín

Caitlín  

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Religion
This Irish version (one of many) of the French name Catherine has been borne by thousands of historical personages since the 12th century. The best-known mythical or folkloric bearer of the name is ...
Cath Maige Tuired

Cath Maige Tuired  

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Religion
(Battle of Mag Tuired),a saga of the mythological cycle dealing with the defeat of the malevolent Fomoiri by the gods of the Irish, known as the Tuatha Dé Danann ...
cauldron

cauldron  

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Religion
[Ar]A large metal bowl with a rounded base used for cooking and serving food. Two types of bronze cauldrons are known from the later Bronze Age of northwest Europe: Class A with necks, usually ...
Cauldron of Plenty

Cauldron of Plenty  

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Religion
The Dagda, the father god of the Irish Tuatha Dé Danaan, possessed a magic cauldron that produced endless food. Another magic cauldron is taken by the hero Cuchulainn from a ...
Cermait

Cermait  

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Religion
[Ir., honey-mouthed].Son of the Dagda killed by Lug Lámfhota for his sexual transgressions with Lug's wife. Cermait's son Mac Cuill later avenged his father by spearing Lug.2. A name given to Ogma, a ...
Cernunnos

Cernunnos  

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Religion
A horned Celtic god of Gaul (modern France) and parts of the British Isles, Cernunnos was a god of fertility, like the Italian goddess Ceres. He carries a club and ...
Corleck Hill

Corleck Hill  

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Religion
Sometimes known in Irish as Sliabh na Trí nDée, Sliabh na nDée Dána [Ir., hill of the three gods], a promontory near Drumeague, Co. Cavan, once known as ‘the pulse of Ireland’. A stone head of Brigit ...
Cridenbél

Cridenbél  

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Subject:
Religion
An ugly, blind satirist in the household of the Dagda, as described in Cath Maige Tuired [The (Second) Battle of Mag Tuired]. When Cridenbél demands the three best bits of Dagda's food, the ruler's ...

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