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Acrisius

Acrisius  

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In mythology, son of Abas, king of Argos (2), and his wife Aglaïa, father of Danaë and brother of Proetus. After Abas' death the two brothers quarrelled; in their warfare ...
Alcestis

Alcestis  

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In Greek mythology, wife of Admetus, king of Pherae in Thessaly, whose life she saved by consenting to die on his behalf. She was brought back from Hades by Hercules.
Amete

Amete  

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Religion
Apollo was forced by Zeus to serve this king of Pherae in Thessaly as a punishment for his having killed the Cyclops. Later Admetus, with Apollo's help, succeeded in marrying Alcestis.[...]
Artemis

Artemis  

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In Greek mythology, a goddess, daughter of Zeus and sister of Apollo. She was a huntress and is typically depicted with a bow and arrows, and was also identified with Selene, goddess of the moon; her ...
Asclepius

Asclepius  

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In Greek mythology, a hero and god of healing, son of Apollo, often represented bearing a staff with a serpent coiled round it. He sometimes bears a scroll or tablet, probably representing medical ...
cave

cave  

A large, natural, underground hollow, usually with a horizontal opening. Karst caves result from solution and corrosion; see Miller (2006) GSA Special Paper 404.
deformity

deformity  

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In antiquity far fewer congenitally deformed persons would have survived infancy than do so today, because Greeks and Romans would have had little compunction about withholding the necessities of ...
fate

fate  

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A fate worse than death rape; the term is recorded from the early 19th century, although earlier in the mid 17th century Dorothy Osborne in a letter refers to ‘the Roman courage, when they killed ...
folktale

folktale  

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Literature
A story passed on by word of mouth rather than by writing, and thus partly modified by successive re‐tellings before being written down or recorded. The category includes legends, fables, jokes, tall ...
Gaia

Gaia  

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Religion
In Greek mythology, the Earth personified as a goddess, daughter of Chaos. She was the mother and wife of Uranus (Heaven); their offspring included the Titans and the Cyclops.Gaia hypothesis the ...
Galatea

Galatea  

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In Greek mythology, the name both of a sea nymph courted by the Cyclops Polyphemus, who in jealousy killed his rival Acis, and that given to the statue fashioned by Pygmalion and brought to life.
giant

giant  

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Religion
Before the arrival of the Israelites several races of giants were said to inhabit the land (Deut. 2). Goliath of Gath was apparently over 2.8 m. (9 feet) tall (1 Sam. 17: 4).
Greek creation

Greek creation  

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Religion
The Greek story of creation—essentially the “official” creation myth of the Olympian religion—is most fully told by Hesiod in his Theogony. Hesiod tells us that in the beginning there was ...
Greek pastoral poetry

Greek pastoral poetry  

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For as long as peasants have tended their flocks and herds on grazing lands away from the village, song and music (esp. that of the pipe (syrinx), which is easily cut, fashioned and carried) have ...
Hephaestus

Hephaestus  

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In Greek mythology, the god of fire and of craftsmen, son of Zeus and Hera, and husband of Aphrodite. He was a divine metalworker who was lame as the result of having interfered in a quarrel between ...
Hylas

Hylas  

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In Greek mythology, a king's son taken as his companion on the expedition of the Argonauts by Hercules; he was drowned when a water-nymph who had fallen in love with him drew him into her fountain.
Maron

Maron  

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In Homer's Odyssey son of Euanthes and priest of Apollo at Ismarus in Thrace (later to be called Maroneia). He gave Odysseus the wine with which he made Polyphemus drunk ...
monsters

monsters  

All mythologies have monsters, nightmare creations that stand in the way of a hero's progress or that plague societies. The terrible Grendel and his equally frightening mother terrorize the Danes ...
Mycenae

Mycenae  

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An ancient city in Greece, situated near the coast in the NE Peloponnese, the centre of the late Bronze Age Mycenaean civilization. The capital of King Agamemnon, it was at its most prosperous in the ...
nomads

nomads  

[Ge]Herding societies whose seasonal movements are primarily dependent on the search for fresh pastures, although exceptionally they may also be involved with limited cultivation.

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