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Charles Horton Cooley

(1864—1929)

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Erving Goffman

Erving Goffman  

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(1922–82)The most influential micro-sociologist during the 1960s and 1970s, Goffman pioneered the dramaturgical perspective for sociology. The influences on his work were many. After completing his ...
group

group  

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Overview Page
A collection of individuals interacting with one another so that each person influences and is influenced by each other person to some degree. Group members are distinguished from a mere aggregate of ...
Howard Becker

Howard Becker  

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(1928– )From a student at the University of Chicago to one of the most well-respected sociology professors in the world, Howard Becker has made an enormous contribution to the symbolic interactionist ...
indirect relationships

indirect relationships  

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Media studies
*Impersonal, institutional relationships between people, mediated by bureaucracies, organizations, markets, corporations, and technological systems (especially information technology). The ...
looking-glass self

looking-glass self  

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Media studies
A term introduced by Cooley to refer to the dependence of our social self or social identity on our appearance to others, especially significant others. Our self-concept or self image—the ideas and ...
primary group

primary group  

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A small group, such as a sports team, family, or professional colleagues, which has its own norms and in which there is much face-to-face interpersonal interaction,
self

self  

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The elusive ‘I’ that shows an alarming tendency to disappear when we try to introspect it. See bundle theory of the mind or self, Cartesian dualism, personal identity.
symbolic interactionism

symbolic interactionism  

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[Th]A theoretical approach in sociology developed by George Herbert Mead, which places strong emphasis on the role of symbols and language as core elements of all human interaction.

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