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Acacian schism

Acacian schism  

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A temporary schism (482–519) between Rome and the East which began while Acacius was Patr. of Constantinople (471–89). It arose out of the Henoticon.
Acathistus

Acathistus  

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(Gk. ‘not sitting’, because it was sung standing), a famous Greek liturgical hymn in honour of the BVM. It may be the work of St Romanos ‘Melodos’, but the authorship is disputed.
acheiropoieta

acheiropoieta  

[Greek, ‘objects not made by [human] hands’] Primarily used of direct impressions of Christ’s face (the Kamoulianai Christ, the Mandylion of Edessa, the Veronica of Rome, and the Shroud of Turin), a ...
Acoemetae

Acoemetae  

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(Gk., akoimētai, ‘sleepless ones’).Orthodox ascetics in general, and in particular monks following the rule of Basil. The term may be applied more generally to Eastern Christian ascetics.
Adeodatus II

Adeodatus II  

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(11 Apr. 672–17 June 676)A Roman, son of Jovinianus, he was from youth a monk of the community of S. Erasmo on the Caelian Hill. He was elected pope in old age at a time when there was an emotional ...
Agathias

Agathias  

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(‘lawyer’), historian and poet in Constantinople, c.ad 532–c.580. A native of Myrina in Asia Minor, where his father was a rhetor, he was educated at Alexandria and Constantinople, where he later ...
Agatho

Agatho  

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(c.577–681), Pope from 678. In 680 he held a council at Rome against the Monothelites. He also took up the cause of Wilfrid of York against Theodore, Abp. of Canterbury. Feast day, 10 Jan.
agora

agora  

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In ancient Greece, a public open space used for assemblies and markets; the term agoraphobia for extreme or irrational fear of open or public places, leading to panic attacks and reclusive behaviour, ...
Albania

Albania  

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History
One of the poorest of the former communist states, Albania is now moving towards the European UnionThough Albania is a coastal country, not much of its territory is at sea level. Mountains make up ...
Albanians

Albanians  

A nation of Thraco-Illyrian origin, in the Middle Ages the Albanians were ruled by the Byzantines (6th-14th cc.) and Bulgars (9th-10th cc.) before succumbing to the Turks (1479). The fourth ...
Alexis, Legend of Saint

Alexis, Legend of Saint  

The starting-point for the legend of St Alexis was probably the existence at Edessa, around the 5th c., of an ascetic famous for his extreme poverty and humility. Starting from ...
Amalfi

Amalfi  

A small Italian city in Campania, clinging to the rocky slopes of its peninsula dominating the bay of Salerno, Amalfi is mentioned as a bishopric in a letter of Pope ...
Anastasia

Anastasia  

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(d. c.304),martyr. She has been venerated at Rome since the 5th century and is mentioned in the Roman Canon. She died at Sirmium (Yugoslavia), notwithstanding her later Acta which make her a Roman ...
Anatolius

Anatolius  

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(c.400–458), Patr. of Constantinople. A native of Alexandria, he was sent by St Cyril to Constantinople and elected bishop when Flavian was deposed in 449. Pope Leo I demanded that he should condemn ...
Angelos

Angelos  

(Ἄγγελος, fem. ᾽Αγγελίνα), a noble Byz. lineage founded by Constantine from Philadelphia, who married Theodora (born 1096), the daughter of Alexios I. According to a 12th-C. historian (Zon. ...
Ani

Ani  

Capital of Bagratid Armenia (991–1045) and seat of the catholicos after 991, Ani was situated on the right bank of the Aχurean, a northern tributary of the Araxes.Enriched by ...
Anicia Iuliana

Anicia Iuliana  

(c. ad 461–527/8),a Constantinopolitan aristocrat (see Constantinople) of western senatorial family (the Anicii) and imperial descent (Valentinian III, grandfather; Olybrius, father); she was a ...
Antioch

Antioch  

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A city in southern Turkey which was the ancient capital of Syria under the Seleucid kings, who founded it c.300 bc.
Apollinarius

Apollinarius  

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Religion
The heresy which denied the completeness of Christ's humanity. Apollinarius (or Apollinaris) (c.310–c.390), who was an upholder of orthodoxy against the Arians, became Bp. of Laodicea c.360. His ...
Apophthegmata Patrum

Apophthegmata Patrum  

Collections of sayings of, or brief stories about, Egyptian monks, known in English as ‘Sayings of the Desert Fathers’. The material dates from the 4th–5th cents. and vividly conveys the spirit of ...

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