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Condorcet paradox

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Arrow's impossibility theorem

Arrow's impossibility theorem  

The theorem provides a proof that no perfect process exists for aggregating individual rankings of alternatives into a collective (or social) ranking. An example of an aggregation process is majority ...
collective choice

collective choice  

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The process of aggregating individual preferences into social preferences in order to make a social (or collective) choice from a set of alternatives. The most frequently encountered collective ...
cyclic majority

cyclic majority  

An intransitive preference order arising from majority voting in a group of individuals with transitive individual preferences. See Condorcet's paradox.
intransitive preferences

intransitive preferences  

Preferences violating the condition that if one alternative is preferred to a second, and the second is preferred to a third, then the first should be preferred to the third. The following is the ...
majority voting

majority voting  

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A voting method which selects as the winner the option with the majority of votes. When a choice is made from just two options May's theorem states that majority voting is the only decision rule to ...
paradox

paradox  

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Subject:
Philosophy
n. (in family therapy) a surprising interpretation or suggestion made in the course of therapy in order to demonstrate the relationship between a psychological symptom and a system of family ...
transitive preferences

transitive preferences  

Preferences having the property that if one alternative is preferred to a second, and the second is preferred to a third, then the first is preferred to the third. It is often assumed to be an axiom ...

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