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civil law

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Admiralty

Admiralty  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The law of admiralty encompasses claims which were originally within the jurisdiction of the Admiralty Court of England and Wales and which are now governed by the Admiralty Act 1988 ...
Bartolo da Sassoferrato

Bartolo da Sassoferrato  

(1313–57),Italian jurist and political theorist. He studied law at Perugia and Bologna and practised as a judicial assessor at Todi and Pisa, and from 1343 taught law at Perugia. ...
canon law

canon law  

The body of rules or laws developing gradually, imposed by church authority in matters of its own organization and discipline (extending also to matters of belief).
Carlo Borromeo

Carlo Borromeo  

(1538–84),Italian cardinal, born on 2 October 1538 in the castle of Arona (on Lake Maggiore), the second son of the count of Arona. At the age of 12 he ...
chose in action

chose in action  

A right of proceeding in a court of law to obtain a sum of money or to recover damages. Examples include rights under an insurance policy, a debt, and rights under a contract. A chose in action is a ...
Claudio Aquaviva

Claudio Aquaviva  

(1543–1615), fifth General of the Jesuits from 1581. Under his leadership the Society was consolidated both in respect of its internal structures and its characteristic approach to ministry. Its ...
code

code  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.A complete written formulation of a body of law, (e.g. the Code Napoléon in France). A code of English law does not exist, but a few specialized topics have been dealt with in this way by means of ...
Code Napoléon

Code Napoléon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The first modern codification of French civil law, issued between 1804 and 1810, which sought, under the direction of J. J. Cambacérès, to reorganize the French legal system. Napoleon himself ...
common law

common law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
1 The part of English law based on rules developed by the royal courts during the first three centuries after the Norman Conquest (1066) as a system applicable to the whole country, as opposed to ...
comparative Law

comparative Law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Comparative law involves a process of drawing lessons from a confrontation of two or more legal systems. Comparison is a method which can serve a number of purposes. It can ...
constitution

constitution  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.The rules and practices that determine the composition and functions of the organs of central and local government in a state and regulate the relationship between the individual and the state. ...
contempt of court

contempt of court  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The offence of being disobedient to or disrespectful of a court of law and its officers.
Corpus Iuris Canonici

Corpus Iuris Canonici  

The concept of a Corpus iuris canonici (‘body’ of canon law) did not exist in the early or high MA, but evolved over five centuries. The medieval and early modern ...
criminal law

criminal law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
In Anglo‐Saxon and Norman England, there was no distinction between criminal and civil law. Violence, or the causing of damage or harm to another's person or property, was subject to savage penalties ...
customary law

customary law  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
(traditional cultures)The traditional law of indigenous peoples, generally oral, sometimes narrative or based on established performative practice, including song and dance, rather than in written ...
Diego de Espinosa

Diego de Espinosa  

(1502–72),Spanish cardinal and statesman who studied civil law at Salamanca, where he later became a professor. He was appointed as a crown judge in Seville, and was subsequently appointed ...
Doctors' Commons

Doctors' Commons  

The popular name for the College of Advocates founded in the 1490s by Richard Blodwell, dean of the arches (i.e. the judge of the provincial court of the archbishop of ...
Dutch law

Dutch law  

Medieval law in the Netherlands was based on an early unwritten system of customary law which had later been formulated in the Salic law and the Frisian code of the ...
Edict of Nantes

Edict of Nantes  

(13 April 1598), an edict signed at Nantes by King Henri IV, who granted the Huguenots (his former co-religionists) extensive rights and confirmed earlier edicts of 1564 and 1570. Under ...
English Law

English Law  

From the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries differed fundamentally from the legal systems of continental Europe in three important respects. First, English law was (and remains) uncodified and ...

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