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Charlemagne

(742—814)

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Aachen

Aachen  

(town, palace) West central German town, known for its hot springs. Aachen’s significance is linked to Charlemagne, who created a Carolingian palace complex there, where he was buried. Successive ...
Abbasid

Abbasid  

A member of a dynasty of caliphs who ruled in Baghdad from 750 to 1258, named after Abbas (566–652), the prophet Muhammad's uncle and founder of the dynasty.
Académie Palatine

Académie Palatine  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Centre of learning and literary activity at the court of Charlemagne. The English scholar Alcuin was one of its chief luminaries.
Adalard of Corbie

Adalard of Corbie  

(751–826)A cousin of Charlemagne, Adalard was raised at court with his brother Wala. He retired to Corbie where, after a stay at Monte Cassino, he returned as abbot (780). ...
Adam of Bremen

Adam of Bremen  

Summoned to Bremen in 1066/7 by Archbishop Adalbert soon after he and his see had suffered setbacks, Adam was made scholasticus and given the task of writing the Gesta Hammaburgensis ...
Adoptianism

Adoptianism  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
1 The heresy, originating in Spain in the 8th cent., according to which Christ, in His humanity, is not the true, but only the adopted, Son of God. Elipandus, Abp. of Toledo, arguing against ...
Adrian I, pope

Adrian I, pope  

(died 795)A Roman, Adrian I was consecrated on 9 Feb 772 and died on Christmas day 795. His was certainly one of the most important pontificates, from a politico-religious ...
Aetios

Aetios  

Eunuch and patrikios; died 26 July 811 (?). Aetios was protospatharios and trusted adviser of Empress Irene in 790, when Constantine VI exiled him. He regained influence after Irene's return ...
Alamanni

Alamanni  

[CP]A confederation of several Germanic tribes who amalgamated in the 3rd century ad. In c.ad 260 they conquered the Roman frontier lands between the Rhine and the Danube, and remained there, despite ...
Alcuin

Alcuin  

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Overview Page
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History
(c. 735–804)English scholar and theologian. In 782 was employed by Emperor Charlemagne as head of his palace school at Aachen, where his pupils included many of the outstanding figures in the ...
Alsace

Alsace  

The territory between the Vosges Mountains, Rhine river, and Jura Mountains, known by the 7th century as ‘Alsace’. Roman military settlement in the area included a base at what would ...
Amalarius of Metz

Amalarius of Metz  

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Overview Page
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Religion
(died after 850)The Carolingian liturgist and theologian Amalarius of Metz was a pupil of Alcuin at Tours before being appointed archbishop of Trier in 811. During Agobard's exile (c.834), he was ...
Ambrosius Autpertus

Ambrosius Autpertus  

(died 784)Born in Provence, a monk at San Vincenzo al Volturno in the Beneventano, Ambrosius Autpert became its abbot in 777. In 774 Charlemagne had defeated the Lombards, but ...
Ami et Amile

Ami et Amile  

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Overview Page
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Literature
Short (3,500‐line) chanson de geste from the turn of the 12th and 13th c., telling a story which also appears as a saint's life [see Hagiography], a romance, and a miracle play, and whose main theme ...
Amis et Amiles

Amis et Amiles  

OFr. chanson de geste, c.1200, concerning physically identical friends. When Amiles is accused of having slept with Charlemagne’s daughter Belissant, Amis secretly and successfully takes his place in ...
Andernach, battle of

Andernach, battle of  

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(876)After the death of Emperor Louis I “the Pious” (840), the Carolingian Empire broke up into different parts, all ruled by members of the Carolingian family. Charles II “the ...
Andorra

Andorra  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
A small co‐principality in the Pyrennes, between France and Spain.Physical.Andorra has a landscape of valleys at around 900 m (3000 feet) which rise to peaks at 2900 m (9600 feet). The attractive ...
Anglo-Latin literature to 1847

Anglo-Latin literature to 1847  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
From the 7th to the mid‐19th cents, thousands of English writers produced Latin writings in great quantity, both in prose and in verse, addressed to a Latin‐reading public in continental Europe and ...
Aniane

Aniane  

Founded by Benedict of Aniane in 782 in the diocese of Montpellier, and endowed by Charlemagne, Aniane was one of the two ‘exemplary cloisters’ of the Carolingian monastic reform. Embroiled ...
Annales Regni Francorum

Annales Regni Francorum  

Written in the chapel of Charlemagne and Louis the Pious (814–40), present a detailed but slanted—particularly by omission—record of royal activities (741–829). Writing probably began sometime ...

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